My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Tuesday—Today, the members of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial Foundation will hold a ceremony at my husband's grave. We will all meet at 12 o'clock in the rose garden, where daffodils will be blooming, and I like to think that he knows of our presence and the joining of our thoughts.

The members of the foundation will have an opportunity to talk to George Palmer, Park Service Superintendent who looks after the house, grave and grounds, and with Mr. Kahn who watches over the library. The library was of such great interest to my husband that I am always grateful when his friends take an interest in it. Someday I hope there can be an international wing added to the library where the things given by foreign countries can be permanently on exhibition. We need to be reminded of the goodwill that can exist in the world, and these gifts always remind me of the goodwill my husband felt for all the peoples of the world.

I was up early yesterday and started on the road to Lake Success by 7:30 in the morning. It was a beautiful day and a beautiful drive down the parkway, and I have discovered that at that early hour you can drive from here and reach the United Nations building in two hours and a quarter.

When I looked at the bulletin board to find the number of our conference room, I was surprised to see that the meeting was cancelled. I never noticed that the board carried Saturday's schedule and it was only when I got a copy of the journal for the day that I noticed everyone was still busily at work tidying up. Then I realized that 10 o'clock was the earliest hour that I was expected to arrive for the day's work and, therefore, I should have waited until that hour and been a little more observing of the date on the board!

We did not actually get started at the Human Rights Commission meeting until 15 minutes late, which elicited the remark from Dr. P.C. Chang that he did not think any meeting ever began on time at Lake Success.

This meeting was one especially called to elect the members of the subcommittee of the Human Rights Commission on freedom of information. That was the only thing on our agenda, so after we had read the rules governing our election we proceeded to ballot immediately on the list of nominations. Eleven members of the sub-commission were elected on the first ballot. We had to cast another ballot for the twelfth place, which was contested for by three members. Finally, it narrowed down to a choice between two people, and when that was settled the twelfth member was elected and we adjourned.

From Lake Success I went into the city, and before taking the train to Hyde Park in the afternoon I went to the Macbeth Gallery to see the exhibition of Olin Dows' original drawings for the book, "Franklin Roosevelt at Hyde Park." I enjoyed very much seeing the originals, and Mr. Dows has so many drawings that he is holding an exhibition at the present time in Poughkeepsie, also. If I can manage to do so, I hope to see that, too, before it closes.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL