My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—I went yesterday noon to meet with the Christian Association of City College in St. James Presbyterian Church, here. It was a really grand group of young people, many of them students in the liberal arts and sciences, and a few girls from the College of Education. These girls are not allowed in the liberal arts college or in the science school, so most of them are found in downtown City College where they take business administration and government. It is very encouraging that these hard-working young people will take time out to have a meeting at the noon hour to discuss the public question of the day. The boys made the sandwiches for lunch and I am sure all of us had everything we needed in a nice, friendly atmosphere.

In the evening I went to an early dinner to speak to the students at the P and S Club of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University on the Declaration of Human Rights.

Later in the evening I was still able to attend the dinner at the Plaza given by the United Jewish Appeal in honor of Mrs. David M. Levy, who has given so generously of her time and effort to this cause.

Many of us who have worked with Mrs. Levy over the years have marvelled at her selflessness and devotion. It is to her foresight and generosity that we owe the Citizens Committee on Children, which has kept us informed on what was being done and what should be done for the benefit of the children of the city.

It is a tradition in her family to be public-spirited, but it is an inspiration to have seen her work on the Rosenwald Fund. One could always count that her reaction to any problem would be that of a generous and farsighted person. To do anything in her honor is a joy to her friends, and so I was grateful for the opportunity of being one of her many friends and admirers at the dinner last evening.

Now I want to quote to you a paragraph from a letter which came to me the other day:

"We now know many ways to conserve and develop our resources, but these methods are not being widely used. TVA has never once been repeated. Sustained-yield forestry has been demonstrated, but awaits any real important use. We are not doing enough in the field of soil conservation to keep even close to our losses. Almost heroic measures are needed to win for conservation the attention and action so urgently needed."

Something has to be done, and an emergency conference has been organized on the subject and will be held in Washington in the Interior Department auditorium from April 21 to 24. I cannot be there, but I shall watch what happens with great interest and I hope that many other people throughout the country will realize that these things are basic to the life of our nation and, therefore, will watch the conference and join in the fight for conservation.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL