My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Yesterday was such a busy day for me, doing many things which were serious, that my mind reverted several times to the relaxation of seeing Paul Muni in the revival of "They Knew What They Wanted." I was amused to be told that some of the critics thought Mr. Muni's portrayal of an Italian was exaggerated and rather too melodramatic. I chuckled all the way through the play at what I felt was a really good portrayal of some of the Italians I have met in my travels in various parts of Italy.

Anyhow, on Monday night he afforded me entertainment, and as I progressed from one chore to another yesterday I found myself thinking with pleasure about the play and dwelling on the amusing scenes.

There was one interesting interlude in my day yesterday when Hector Chevigny came to the studio to be interviewed for one of my broadcasts. He writes a radio mystery called, "Mr. and Mrs. North," and has written several books, the latest one being the story of a religious woman leader in Los Angeles.

Several years ago he came to New York a young and active man. Suddenly he went blind. But that didn't stop his work. He found a new friend in his seeing-eye dog, Wizard, which, as long as his harness is on, is completely obedient and quiet. He is his master's friend and mainstay. These dogs are really an extraordinary development in the way of training and intelligence.

In reading the story in the papers of the dog who meets all the tankers coming into port in Elizabeth, N.J., looking for his master, Chief Engineer Sigvald Falnes, I could not help thinking that such loyalty and perseverance would not be found in many human beings.

To meet every tanker, to have the disappointment of finding the tanker on which your master sailed and yet not to find your master on it, and still go on day after day taking food from strangers but attaching yourself to no one simply because you remain faithful to a master who for nine months has not come back, is a loyalty that would try the soul of many a man!

Yesterday afternoon I attended a meeting of representatives of various organizations under the auspices of the National Council of Women. This group is devising ways in which these organizations can best help the people to become familiar with the Declaration of Human Rights and to understand the Covenant which will someday follow. This is along the lines suggested for action by the resolution passed in the last General Assembly, asking that every means possible be used in various countries for education on this subject. These women's clubs should do a valuable job.

Last night I met with the Pi Lambda Theta, which has been studying how to develop better world understanding. Since most of the members are planning to take their places in the teaching world, and many of them have already done so, this is a group particularly able to convey the purpose and importance of increased international cooperation.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL