My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WEBSTER GROVES, Mo., Monday—The weekend with Protestant Episcopal Bishop of Missouri, Dr. William Scarlett, and Mrs. Scarlett was a very pleasant interlude for me.

After a nice, quiet luncheon on Saturday there was a press conference, but the press seemed to consist mainly of youngsters. The few members of the working press on hand were swallowed up in the sea of young faces. The League of Women Voters also had a delegation present.

Certain questions appear to come up over and over again, such as, for instance, questions about the Atlantic Pact. These, of course, I cannot answer, because the substance of the security alliance has not yet been published and I don't know what the pact contains. Similarly, the question on whether Molotov's replacement by Vishinsky will make a change in USSR policy is another one I cannot answer. Until we actually see what happens, nobody will know.

When the interviews were ended I did a short recording for a special broadcast that is to be made soon and then I went with Mr. Smith of the Jefferson Memorial Committee to see the model of the new national shrine at the art museum. This conception of the memorial that commemorates our territorial expansion of the early 19th century is very interesting and I'm sure the developed area will be very effective and striking. We drove down from the art museum to the courthouse where the Dred Scott case was tried, and we even drove along the waterfront to get a better idea of how the shrine will really look.

I can remember when my husband and I drove along the waterfront when the memorial was in its very first stages, but most of the buildings that stood there are all torn down and it is easier to see where trees will be planted. There are two buildings still standing that will remain in the area—the charming old church and the old Astor fur-trading post.

We had a very interesting dinner party in the evening and on Sunday morning my secretary, Mrs. Silliman, and I both went to church with Bishop and Mrs. Scarlett. We didn't go to the cathedral, but instead went some distance away to a small church where the Bishop was conducting a confirmation service.

His sermon on the state of the church will be remembered for a long time. It was an honest, straightforward facing of the problems of today and the church's position toward them. It stirred one to thought and action.

After lunch Mrs. Silliman and I were able to do a little work, and at 4 o'clock children and grandchildren came in to tea.

At 5:15 I was taken off by my lecture sponsors to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Weil for a small reception, after which dinner was served. Later in the evening I spoke on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

On the whole, this was a peaceful weekend, and as I look back over this entire trip I have been rather fortunate in not being too hurried or too busy on the Sundays.

The Bishop's house in St. Louis is a delightful home flooded with sunshine and with pleasant grounds around it. Everything was covered with fresh snow on Sunday morning but by afternoon it was about gone. The Scarlett dog has a gay time in the yard, and she is always running from door to door begging to be let in again almost as soon as she is let out, which shows proper affection for her family.

The visitors who are really catered to, however, are the birds. They have houses and feeding stations all around, and I saw a lovely red cardinal pecking around while we were eating lunch. Mrs. Scarlett tells me that they spend the winter here, as do many other varieties of birds.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL