My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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LOS ANGELES, Wednesday—The flight from San Francisco to Los Angeles on a clear day is a very delightful one, particularly if you fly along the coast. My children here hooted at me because my reservations were made on a plane that stopped at Salinas and Santa Barbara and took much longer than the through plane, but I really enjoyed our trip down very much, and it was a nice prelude to seeing my two boys, James and John, and my daughter, Anna, waiting for us at the airport.

They rushed us into the airport restaurant to get a quick bite of luncheon, and then Anna and I went straight to the radio studio. Almost before I knew it we were talking to each other on the air.

Afterwards I found my way back to the hotel, where Mrs. Silliman, my secretary, and the bags were already installed and the usual number of letters and requests for appointments and appearances at this and that function were awaiting.

The press conference went off quickly, but at the end we had a bit of dramatics which made me think that men as a whole always stay a little bit like children. The feud here between the press and the radio seems very bitter and the representative of one of the radio stations had brought in a recording machine with the intention of asking me for a two-minute interview after the press conference.

Someone spied his machine and evidently thought that he might possibly have been recording while the conference was going on. I was quite sure this was impossible, as I have always had to talk into a little microphone and none had been visible. But the gentlemen said harsh words to each other and tried to suggest that this was an effort to show me disrespect.

I must say that, as far as I was concerned, it did not seem very important in spite of all the heated words between the gentlemen of the press and the radio representative and the head of the forum, for whom I speak tonight.

Early in the afternoon my youngest son, John, came for me and we went to his home in Pasadena to see his wife and three children. They are lovely children and I am sure they were on their best behavior. So, I cannot help feeling that to really know them I must have them on a long visit at Hyde Park.

The whole family dined together at my daughter's last night, and I was delighted to see my oldest grandson, Buzzie Boettiger, looking so well and strong. He is now at college and I hope his trip abroad with me last fall has not set him back too much in his studies.

This visit is too short to talk over all the things one would like to talk about. In addition to my family, I have Mrs. Hershey Martin here, and her baby is my godchild. I would like to see something of them as well. Mrs. Martin and her husband picked me up at Anna's last night and brought me back to the hotel. It was rather a long drive and we did have a little chance to talk.

Among all these young people I find a great interest in the United Nations and a great desire to do something as individuals to bring about more quickly the chance for peace in a world where justice and harmony would reign.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL