My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SAN FRANCISCO, Tuesday—Saturday morning I took the plane fairly early for Portland, Oregon, where I spent 24 hours with my oldest grandchild, who is now married and living there. Having a number of other friends in and around Portland, I spent a busy time trying to see them all before leaving Sunday afternoon for San Francisco. I saw a great many people, but none of them quite long enough, particularly my two grandchildren, Sistie and her husband, whom I had not seen since their wedding.

The trip down was smooth and very beautiful, but unfortunately there were just enough clouds to hide the mountains. The day before, however, on our flight to Portland we got a glimpse of Mt. Rainier which is just good luck for I have spent days in Seattle without ever seeing that elusive peak.

Coming into San Francisco after the lights of the city are lit is really wonderful. With all the bridges outlined in lights and the main avenues usually looking bejewelled with their many colored lights, it is like a fairy land below the plane. We woke this morning in the Mark Hopkins Hotel to a most beautiful view of the bay and the hills beyond.

My first appointment was with Rabbi Morris Goldstein and a small group of people representing the Associated Jewish Organizations of San Francisco. They gave me a very beautiful scroll in appreciation of my work in the United Nations.

Later, the usual press and photographers came in to take their shots and ask their questions.

Invariably the first question is my reaction to the change from Mr. Molotov to Mr. Vishinsky. I have to reply that I have no more information than is in the papers, none of which is very informative, and therefore I can make no comment.

The rest of the day was spent seeing a great number of people, though I saved a little time for an excursion into Chinatown and my usual visit to Gump's. At Gump's they have beautiful Chinese things and usually some handicraft work from California artists, which always interests me. In Chinatown I nearly always go to the shop of my old friend, Suey Hong, and though my visits are so rare, he never forgets me and takes great pains to show me his wares.

The lecture tonight will be for the Town Hall series and Tuesday morning we leave for Los Angeles.

I have just finished reading Robert Magidoff's book, "In Anger and Pity." To those who are interested in trying to understand the present situation between the USSR and ourselves, I think this will be a useful book. A knowledge of the language, long residence and a real sympathy for the problems there, make his answers to the questions most often asked him on his lecture trips a really valuable contribution. He confirms my belief that we in this country have done things at times which must be bewildering to the people as well as to the government of the USSR. And I think he gives me hope that with patience and time we may work out a method of living in the same world peacefully.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL