My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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REGINA, Saskatchewan, Canada, Wednesday—The weather here in western Canada is dry, and we have been fortunate in finding it clear. Even the cold during our day and a half in Winnipeg did not bother us. I am astonished at the way the cars drive around without snow tires or chains. Local residents tell me, though, that when they venture out into the country they sometimes get stuck.

Immediately after I had a press conference in Winnipeg in the office of our consul general, the mayor had a lunch in my honor. During the afternoon we had a little time to rest before we went to the reception held by the members of B'nai B'rith-Hillel Foundation, which was sponsoring my lecture Monday evening. During this reception I was most grateful for having with me Lieut. Gen. Roland F. and Mrs. McWilliams, who were kind enough to be with us as we received the members of the organization and their friends. This was held in the Hudson Bay Company's building and their chef had made a most beautiful cake to welcome me to Winnipeg. I cut it while the photographers snapped photographs, which reminded me of my days in Washington when I used to have to cut cakes on my husband's birthday at all the various balls. The Hudson Bay Company also presented me with some fur skins, which was the nicest gift I could have received.

In the evening I was introduced to the audience by Mrs. McWilliams. I spoke in a big auditorium holding 5,000 people and there was an overflow of several hundred who could listen although they could not be in the same room.

There is great interest here in the United Nations, and that gives me tremendous satisfaction.

On Tuesday morning we went out to the University of Manitoba and I was given an honorary degree and spoke for a few minutes to the students. After a luncheon there, which was served by the Home Economics Department, in the Faculty Club, we took the plane for Regina.

I noticed while in Chicago an account of the scene in the Senate when Senator Brewster of Maine attacked our President for his speech at the Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner and then scornfully read the menu of the Washington dinner.

I am making no defense of the menu, since I was not present, but these dinners are one of the methods used to raise money for the Democratic organization. The Republicans also have an organization, but they find money-raising easier and simpler than the Democrats do.

If all of us, as citizens, functioned without any reminders of our duties, organizations for both parties might be unnecessary. But we seem to need a little prodding, and it does not seem to me undemocratic to ask those who can afford to give $100 to be at a dinner and to renew their contacts with others interested in their particular party. There are other ways in which those who cannot afford to attend these dinners can give what they choose and be a part of the organization, but it seems to me that the session the Senate devoted to this discussion was far less reasonable or useful than the dinners themselves.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL