My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WINNIPEG, Manitoba, Monday—I am finding my trip both interesting and novel, for I have never seen this part of the country before. I am familiar with our own West, but the northwest of Canada is new to me. Its possibilities for future development seem infinite, and it gives one a sense of the youth of our continent.

Nevertheless, I shall feel on Wednesday, March 2, threads of interest drawing my thoughts toward New York City. On that day the Women's Division of the United Jewish Appeal will hold a rally and I shall be really regretful that for the first time in many years I will not be able to be there.

My son, Franklin, Jr., will be taking my place as a speaker and that is as it should be, for I believe in letting the young step in and take up the interests which the older people must sometime put aside. I wish I could be there to hear him speak. In addition, Aubrey S. Eban1, who is Israel's representative at the United Nations and whom I met in Paris, and Ephraim Gomberg, of the Philadelphia Jewish Appeal, will make of this rally a memorable occasion.

I have always felt that this appeal should not be supported only by our American Jewish people. It should receive support in Greater New York and throughout the country by all American citizens. In the Displaced Persons camps of Europe I have seen the results accomplished by the money raised in our country. I have seen children, who had wandered homeless and suffering, given special care, trained and educated so they would arrive in Israel ready to accept the new lives they would have to lead there and to make their contributions to that country as soon as possible.

Our financial aid will help to bring peace in Europe and stability to the economy of Germany if the DP camps are emptied. The United Jewish Appeal is trying as soon as possible to take their share of people out of those camps. In addition, such people as leave those camps do not go to Israel, but come to the United States, need aid and help for their establishment and recovery. The UJA gives them that aid.

There are other displaced persons to be found in North Africa and in China, and some intend to stay where they are. They need help to combat discrimination and prejudice. This agency and its resources are doing a great deal in this fundamental piece of work. All over the world people are trying to promote understanding among the people of all religious faiths and to establish as a basis for future peace in the world a recognition of the dignity of all human beings and an acceptance of the human rights which must go with the recognition of the value of each and everyone of God's children, regardless of race, or sex, or creed, or national origin.

In helping the United Jewish Appeal, people in every land show that they are men and women of goodwill.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL
1 Abba Eban