My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—It is interesting to learn that from the Allied and German scientists in Germany should come the development of "ersatz" foods.

These certainly will be of value not only to the Germans, but to many countries where the population is very dense and the real foods are in short supply. These synthetic foods will be cheaper than the real foods, but they will taste like the real thing and contain all the nutritional values of real food. They can be produced in great quantities and distributed where they are actually needed.

I can quite understand why the German politicians are opposing this development because, since the real thing is provided by the occupying powers and since they quite naturally want to build up their own herds of cattle, they do not want a substitute that will delay the importation from other countries. But "ersatz" foods right now will give them a full ration, which they have not had in the past—half of it real and half of it synthetic. The scientists also have developed a milk substitute and have found that children drinking it are as well off as those drinking whole milk. This will be a great thing for countries where milk is still short. In France, when I was there last autumn, no one over five years old was getting a full ration of milk. If this new product has the same nutritional value it can certainly be used in cooking and, when necessary, even for drinking purposes.

Synthetic things never do appeal to me as much as the real things, but I can see that vast areas of the world, which never have had enough meat or milk, will be far better off. These synthetic foods, with their real nutrition, can be distributed at prices that are within the reach of the populations most in need.

I spent Sunday evening in Baltimore, making a speech on the Declaration of Human Rights, and flew home afterwards. We ran into some delay and the result was a rather short period of sleep!

We took the one o'clock train to Hyde Park on Monday and I spoke in the evening before the new Dutchess County Council on World Affairs, an organization that is growing by leaps and bounds and has already acquired 350 members. This is very encouraging and a sign of the interest that people are developing in foreign affairs.

This week the American Heart Association launches its drive to raise $5,000,000 to increase "research, education and local community cardiac services."

There is no doubt that heart diseases take the highest toll among our people at the present time, and it is in the interest of everyone to help this program. Especially is it important to develop the services for young people. Children who develop heart disease after rheumatic fever or from other causes can often recover with the proper care. But if they are neglected, the condition is apt to mean a handicap throughout life.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL