My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—On Sunday the President's wreath was brought up here by Colonel Morris J. Lee and a group of cadets from West Point and placed on my husband's grave as usual on the anniversary of his birthday. Afterwards I took the group for a hurried trip through the house and library.

My son and daughter-in-law had as their guests the Yuvraj of Jammu and Kashmir and Major and Mrs. J. Nethersole. The young Prince of Kashmir, who has been in this country for an operation, is returning home in a few days to complete his final two years of college. It is his desire later to serve in the United Nations and help to build a peaceful world.

The Prince was interested in seeing not only the little ceremony attending the laying of the President's wreath but in the ceremony that followed at the grave—the laying of the Roosevelt Home Club wreath by Arthur Smith, postmaster of Hyde Park Village, who was followed by the children from the Roosevelt School, each laying a carnation on the grave.

Because of the good weather there was quite a crowd both in the house and at the museum. Usually in winter, when traveling is difficult, there are comparatively few who come to the museum. This winter, however, except for a very few days, the weather has been good enough to permit a large number of weekday and Sunday visitors to make the trip.

In the evening the family went to a memorial service in the Methodist Church here, held under the auspices of the March of Dimes Committee. Dr. Edith Mead spoke on infantile paralysis and the collection was given to the March of Dimes fund.

Yesterday a young couple braved the snowstorm and came up from New York City to lunch with me and to discuss certain questions dealing with the young man's project of writing a thesis at Amherst on social and economic rights. I was very much afraid that his questions might be too learned for me to answer, but he seemed satisfied. Tomorrow he is going to Lake Success, where I am sure, he will find Dr. John Humphrey, head of the Human Rights Commission secretariat, an even more successful purveyor of information on this subject.

Last night I went over to join Basil O'Connor in the library of the big house where we broadcast for the March of Dimes on the regular birthday program and I had the privilege of introducing Vice President Barkley, who spoke from Washington.

It was very kind of the Vice President to take time out for this occasion and I often wish that my husband could be here to thank old friends such as Mr. O'Connor, Mr. Barkley, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and the many others who do so much to keep on with the work that my husband started in various fields and which he would be glad to see developing.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL