My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—As a Democrat, I have been giving some serious thought to an important consideration in connection with the national elections in November. No Democrat wants any support from the Progressive party and I should not think they would want any support from the so-called Dixiecrats.

Therefore, Democratic voters must concentrate on electing every liberal they possibly can in every state in the Union, and for every office, whether it is for Senator, Representative, Governor, or a member of a state legislature.

If we are going to elect a Democratic President he deserves to be able to carry out the things he believes in. It has been manifested that he cannot do that unless we elect liberals all the way down the line.

I have no idea whether the country as a whole has been thinking through the problems facing it and has been deciding what actual policies it wants to support on Election Day. If, however, President Truman in his recommendations to Congress has stood for the things that the average man in this country believes will be of benefit to him, then the duty of the voter in the coming elections is clear. He must elect Democrats all the way up and down the board. If he does this the President would not be in the unhappy position of recommending legislature to a hostile Congress and to states that are not willing to cooperate through their state governments.

A Democratic President, if elected, must be able to carry out the things that the people of this country actually believe are the policies that will benefit them in the next four years, both at home and abroad. And he cannot do that alone.

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The point I want every voter to keep in mind, however, is that he is making a choice in this election.

He can put in a new party with a very old and assured record of conservatism.

Is this the time he wishes to do that?

If not, then he must not just put in a man on the Presidential level because he stands for liberal policies. He must put in the party that has had a liberal record, and he must insist that it stands for all the policies he believes in as a liberal voter.

The leaders of labor have come out for the Democratic candidates and for the Democratic party. They realize that the Taft-Hartley law, while it may have some good points, is basically a bad bill and probably only the beginning of worse things to come.

The farmer, traditionally, is supposed to be a Republican, and yet in the last few years he has come to realize that his interests are tied rather closely with the interests of labor. It would be well for him to insist that certain revisions be made in laws that supposedly benefit the farmer alone. But he is as dependent on liberal thinking and policies as the man who works in the factory.

The farmer should begin to look carefully at the working records of the two political parties. Deeds speak more forcefully than words, and the voter in 1948 must be careful how he uses his vote.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL