My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—I came to New York City yesterday bent on frivolity. With two young girls—my granddaughter, Chandler and a friend—I was going to shop, which is a necessity when you shop for yourself but an entertainment when you shop for the young.

At my usual department store, we found a sweet little evening dress for one youngster and a very nice coat for the other one. After bidding goodbye to our young friend, my granddaughter and I went off on a round of less interesting errands, all of which, however, were part of the business of getting ready to go to Paris for the United Nations General Assembly meetings.

We went first to the dentist's, then for a pair of shoes, then a hurried visit to pick up some birthday presents for a family celebration next week and to order some Christmas presents, which I may get home too late to acquire.

With those chores done, we met two very delightful friends of mine for lunch, Mrs. Albert Lasker and Mrs. Anna Rosenberg, who were kind enough to invite my granddaughter.

Mrs. Lasker and Mrs. Rosenberg are always a stimulating pair, and this was an especially interesting luncheon because I had a glimpse of the report on the nation's health which Oscar Ewing is shortly going to make to the President. When this report is released to the public I shall hope to tell you more about the things in it which seem to me important to every individual in the country.

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In mid-afternoon I got back to my apartment to meet a Mr. Lal from India, who came to tell me about the foundation that recently has been established to further the exchange of lecturers between India and the United States in the interests of better understanding. The leaders of India feel that their nation, because of its geographical position, may very well exert a great influence on the history of the future, and anything that brings better understanding between India and the U.S. is important to both of us.

Later in the afternoon I saw Julio Garzon and Mrs. Jose Camprubi, of "La Prensa," a Spanish daily newspaper of New York City. They have bought my column and are translating it for publication in their paper. We had a very sociable chat, and I expressed the hope that their readers would be pleased with what I have to write.

Finally, I had a talk with Walter White, who is being sent by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to the U.N. General Assembly meetings and who will be on the steamer with us. He showed me with pride the first copy of his forthcoming book, his autobiography, which he was taking home to his wife. I cannot write about the book until the publication date, which is later this month. I find Mr. White such an interesting person and his whole attitude toward life is such an encouragement to faith in humanity that I am very sure his story will be one that no one should fail to read.

Last evening, we took Chandler to dinner and then to see "Mr. Roberts." I have already written a review of this play, after I saw it the first time, but I must say again that it bears seeing twice and the impression is no less good the second time.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL