My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Yesterday, one of the hottest of Hudson River days, was the closing day of a loan exhibition entitled, "Heritage of the Hudson Valley." Under the auspices of the Cornwall Garden Club and the Hudson River Conservation Society, it was held at the New York Military Academy in Cornwall. It was a small but very interesting exhibition, and I only wish that there were somewhere a permanent exhibition where people could go and learn the background and history of the Hudson River Valley.

There are still many families living on the banks of the Hudson who have ties reaching far back to the earliest days of New York State. But many new people are coming in and the banks of the river no longer belong to the descendants of the original settlers. I think we ought therefore let the newcomers know enough about the past so they will want to cherish this heritage and make it available to future generations. The scenic beauty of the river should not be spoiled by new factories. Factories must be built, but the builders should take into account the preservation of the river's beauty. If possible, historic houses should be restored, and not destroyed.

Some lovely paintings were lent for this exhibition—a George Inness owned by Olin Dows, and one of his own winter landscapes. We are rich in painters in this area, and so there were some modern as well as old canvases. There was some lovely old silver and some interesting modern silver jewelry, many fine old books and also Governor Clinton's desk. One of the most interesting things to me was the case in which were exhibited some of Frederic W. Goudy's printing. It is an art which he practised and in which his wife helped him. I think few people achieved more beautiful results.

On a table in the middle of the room was a model of the old Mary Powell—the old Hudson River steamboat which was familiar to every child who lived along the Hudson in the days when my husband and I were young.

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I am sure that everyone read with great regret of Justice Hughes' death yesterday. He lived a long life, full of honors and good works, and one can only be grateful that we have had a citizen of such fine qualities so long in our midst. He surely influenced countless people to do more for their country, and it is fortunate that he leaves children and grandchildren to carry on the traditions of his type of service to the nation.

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The heat still continues, and much as we long for rain, none comes. Everything is so dry that two of our men, who started to burn off some old grass in a field the other day, suddenly found themselves with a small prairie fire on their hands and had to summon all the men they could muster to put it out.

I am sorry for the people in the cities, when even here we must sleep on our porches at night and find ourselves waiting for a breeze to make it possible to breathe. This is the second year that the end of August has brought us such hot weather, and I begin to think that the time to be away from the Hudson River is during the month of August. I only hope that by Wednesday, when I have to go to New York City, the weather will be cooler.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL