My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—I am in receipt of a booklet issued by the Pilgrims of London, which gives a complete account of Monday, April 12, 1948, and the ceremonies held in conjunction with the unveiling of the statue of my husband in Grosvenor Square, London.

I particularly like the page in the booklet showing the picture of King George VI laying his wreath at the foot of the statue, accompanied by his speech. Also, I was touched by the reproduction of the benediction that the Archbishop of Canterbury pronounced from the base of the memorial. It reads: "The God of Peace be praised in this our brother whose memorial stands in the hearts of two great nations and for friendship among all free peoples. The God of Peace be praised in him and all his servants who have been valiant and great-hearted in the cause of truth, freedom and true peace.

"God, give us grace to follow their example.
"And, the blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Ghost, be amongst you and remain with you always."

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I heard yesterday in an unexpected way from someone who lives in London that visiting Grosvenor Square was one of the pleasantest things to do in the city. This, I was told, is not only because it is the one square replanted and carefully tended, but because, from the viewpoint of an American, the people who come reverently and stand before the statue and often leave their little floral offerings make a deep impression. Gratitude for friendship is a thing that warms the heart, and one senses that gratitude in the crowds that visit Grosvenor Square.

Bernard M. Baruch, on returning to this country recently told me he felt something of the same warmth when he went to lay his wreath at the foot of the statue. He was particularly impressed by the statue itself. I think the sculptor, Sir William Reid Dick, would have been happy to hear Mr. Baruch's praise of the pose and the resemblance which, according to him, expressed my husband's spirit remarkably well.

* * *

I wonder whether the veteran's organizations in other parts of the country are trying to encourage educational opportunities as they are doing here in Poughkeepsie.

The Council of Veterans organization of the Poughkeepsie area has been trying to arrange with Vassar College authorities to give some extension courses not only to war veterans but to non-veterans as well. They report that the college was cooperative and encouraging and, though it has made no promises, is considering offering courses on the university level with or without degrees.

The college, however, is asking for definite information as to the number of people interested and the type of courses desired. Just how many people really seriously consider taking advantage of such an opportunity would be difficult to estimate, but I can visualize what it would mean if colleges all over the country offered these opportunities to young people. Extension courses would be most welcome to those who have to go to work and could in no other way hope to obtain a college education.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL