My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Friday afternoon I journeyed down to Long Island for a wedding. I know of no more confusing a place than Long Island when you have a specific house to find, but one of my cousin's friends came to my apartment to drive out with me, and after the wedding reception he put us safely back on the road to New York City.

Sometimes, when I see young married couples like this one, I feel that this generation is in a new way repeating our pioneering days. Here was a boy who had gone into the army at 19, had been taken prisoner in the Battle of the Bulge and spent nine months in a German prisoner-of-war camp. When he came home, he went to college and studied in the field of labor relations. He has his first job, and now he and his charming young wife are going off to live in a new place where they know no one. They do it with the kind of gallant determination that will assure them a good life together, and with the same spirit that animated many a girl who said goodbye to her family in the East and trekked through the woods to open up new country and found a new family in the pioneering days.

That evening I spoke to the Collegiate Council for the United Nations at their annual Inter-Collegiate Institute in New York City. The group has grown considerably since a year ago and that is a good sign, for it shows what a live interest there is in the U.N. and that the young people are really studying the organization and the questions coming before it.

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Yesterday was a full day of great importance to the town of Poughkeepsie, where ceremonies were held to mark the opening of the new International Business Machines building. Thomas J. Watson brought General Eisenhower there to make the dedication speech. Gladys Swarthout and Lawrence Tibbett, both of the Metropolitan Opera Company, were there also to give pleasure to all music lovers. Everything went with complete precision in spite of the large crowds. The radio keeps people on time, and even the weather seemed to behave. The Chamber of Commerce gave a luncheon afterward at the Nelson House, at which there were more speeches and such a pleasant, friendly feeling that one began to think there were no such things as divisions in politics or divergences over international or domestic thinking.

I just managed to get home by four o'clock to greet some guests who had come to a musical at my cottage, where Joseph James sang a delightful program. The guests came together to benefit Mt. Holyoke College, which is at present having a drive to raise funds nowadays necessary to the existence of so many women's colleges.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL