My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—Back to work again yesterday morning, and I was moved to hope that the Human Rights Commission would suddenly become conscious of the fact that our time for completing the work of this session is short. We seemed to move with a little more ease and speed than usual, but it will require even more self-restraint and speed than we showed yesterday to get through a Declaration and a Convention on Human Rights, with proper consideration of implementation to be included in the Convention.

I had once suggested that we devote one week to the Declaration, one week to the Convention, and one week to the question of implementation. Someone inquired yesterday when the first week devoted to the Declaration would come to an end, and I had to acknowledge that the commission had never agreed with me on this division of time, and that, as we had moved so slowly thus far, we would have to continue a little longer on the Declaration!

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I heard some very interesting speeches last night at a dinner given to create interest and raise funds for the Hudson Shore Labor School. This school, in Hilda Smith's old home on the Hudson River, almost opposite to Hyde Park, has always been of great interest to me. Various unions run institutes there for short periods of time, and every summer they conduct a training course for leaders in the various unions. The AFL and the CIO cooperate in this field of education, and they both send members of their unions to study there during the summer session.

This year they are also going to have a special course to train teachers in the field of workers' education. And Mr. James Carey, who spoke at the dinner, suggested that members of labor groups going to Europe to help in the European Recovery Plan should meet first at the school and talk over some of the problems that will come up in the course of the operation of the Marshall Plan.

I think it would be a wonderful idea if, in the summer, not just members of unions, but also executives of great industries would join in these courses and live with union members at the Hudson Shore School. I always learn a great deal when I visit them or when they come to visit me, and I think it would be not only enjoyable but very profitable for business executives to get some of the advantages which hitherto have been offered only to union members.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL