My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—As a result of the Ohio primaries, I believe conservative Republican politicians are feeling somewhat happier. Senator Taft will probably stop worrying exclusively about Mr. Stassen as a rival and devote a little more attention to the other contender in the Republican race, who is in many ways more acceptable to the Republican politicians and therefore perhaps more dangerous to Senator Taft.

Governor Dewey, from our own fair State of New York, seems to be campaigning with vigor in the Oregon primary fight, apparently feeling that the decision there will have a decisive effect on his future. This will be Governor Dewey's third try for the Presidential nomination, but, of course, he is a young man and I suppose one can go on trying for the nomination—and even running as a candidate—as long as the party is willing to look upon one as a fair risk!

Before conventions are held, political parties go through internal upheavals, and certainly this year both the Democrats and the Republicans are having plenty of excitement within their own ranks. Issues become much clearer once the nominations are over, when the people can devote themselves to thinking about the actual policies they wish to see carried out for their country—and this means the capacities of the candidates and their probable ability to make these policies realities.

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Congress seems to be going through the same old fight over reciprocal trade agreements. These agreements were former Secretary Cordell Hull's great contribution to a more stabilized world economy, and he must feel deeply worried when he hears that the Republicans have not as yet accepted this rather large factor in such a world goal.

When you leave the fighting political arena, however, perhaps you do not get as excited over these questions! In any case, it is one of the few advantages of growing old that we have more patience and come to believe that in the end, if a thing is really right, it will win out in spite of setbacks. These difficulties often arise because of the self-interest of various individuals involved, and the present situation is, I fear, no exception.

Secretary Marshall, however, has warned that these agreements must be continued as a basis for economic recovery in Europe and other parts of the world. One therefore hopes that even our isolationist Senators and Representatives may realize, no matter how much they dislike it, that it is vital to them and to us as a nation that the rest of the world gets back on its feet.

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It is extremely gratifying to know that Speaker Martin has intervened to help make our adherence to the World Health Organization measurably nearer. There is so much that needs to be done today on a world basis, including the checking of tuberculosis, which might easily spread from Europe to other countries, as well as many other infectious diseases.

The United States has taken part in the interim work and through Dr. Thomas Parran has been actively interested from the very beginning. We must hope that shortly we will be full-fledged members.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL