My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—There is an increasing interest, I find, in bringing foreign students to this country. For instance, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is going to bring 80 foreign graduate students in science and engineering for the regular 12-week summer course this year. Their committee of the National Students Association is sponsoring the project and is trying to raise the money for tuition, food, housing and transportation.

This will give the foreign students, whose facilities for study and work have been wiped out in many places in Europe, an opportunity "to investigate recent developments in their own specialty, to observe the latest in equipment and to note available sources of information for the future." These young scientists and engineers are needed in their own countries in Europe, and this opportunity to gain more knowledge will make them even more useful.

There could be another important gain, I believe, from such a program. If we could only bring students here from all the Eastern European countries, I think it would create a better understanding of our way of life and of our true desires for friendly relations with the rest of the world.

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I was interested to read of the reunion of the Hewitt and Cooper families on Saturday night at the Cooper Union Museum in New York City. Those two famous ancestors, John Hewitt and Peter Cooper, must look down the years and feel that their descendants have "done them proud." I think that Edward R. Hewitt, 81-year-old inventor grandson of Peter Cooper, who called together over 100 members of the two families, must have wanted to remind his fellow Americans of the kind of people who have gone into the making of this country.

In the Cooper-Hewitt clan, men and women alike have distinguished themselves. Among the women in my own generation, I have always admired Mrs. Gifford Pinchot, who was so closely a part of her late husband's life and career and still has achieved so much on her own. She has a strong personality, not soon forgotten. And though she and I are not as young as we were, I think she will gallantly keep on fighting for the causes that she thinks worthwhile as long as she is able to make a trip or deliver a speech.

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Saturday night I went out to the Hackley School in Tarrytown to speak for the Unitarian Laymen's League. As I was taken into the headmaster's house, I discovered that his wife is the sister of my State Department aide in the U.N. General Assembly—Mr. Philip Burnett, who so often visited her during the Assembly session last autumn. It made me feel quite at home to meet some one I had heard so much about.

The boys who waited on us at dinner were day scholars who had come back to the school to do the job. I must say they were efficient helpers, and their mothers must find them useful at home!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL