My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—A very gifted young Frenchman, Rene Le Roy, brought his wife to meet me last week. As we talked, he expressed his concern over the conditions he had observed in France last summer, and she, who has just come to this country, seemed deeply troubled.

Just now, political difficulties seem to endanger any kind of stability in France, and therefore economic recovery is rendered much more difficult. Why is it that nowhere do we seem able to get down to essentials? The shades of political beliefs are very unimportant. What is important is that we remain free to decide what kind of a world we want, what leaders we will accept, and how we will create greater stability for our future.

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On Sunday morning I was able to go to church for the first time in many weeks, having finished the series of weekly broadcasts on the United Nations, which required rehearsing beforehand and gave me very busy Sunday mornings! I was glad to hear from a number of people that these broadcasts had helped to clarify some of the subjects which they had found hard to understand during the current session of the General Assembly.

I hope that the broadcasting company will find the response to this series sufficiently encouraging to want to do another one on the United Nations after the first of the year. But if I go on as moderator, I hope some time can be found during the week, since I couldn't do it again on Sundays.

I forgot to tell my audience over the air, on the day that I closed the series, that I am soon to leave for Geneva, Switzerland, to attend the meetings of the Commission on Human Rights which open on December 1st. And I found that I needed a little free time before leaving!

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I was told by the United Nations radio liaison officer the other day that the U.N. is attempting to build its own "Network for Peace." It now has more than 100 stations in principal cities which are broadcasting its program, "United Nations Today."

This program gives an objective report of the happenings in U.N. meetings, and then broadcasts the voices of the delegates as they debate political, economic and social problems. If you have once visited any of the meetings and can visualize the scene, this broadcast must be almost as good as actually being at the meeting of a council or committee.

The radio liaison office will be delighted to furnish you with a list of the cities and stations if you cannot find this program listed in your local papers. I consider it so important for us all to keep in close touch with the work of the United Nations that I hope this program will be a great success and that, before long, some of the major networks will be carrying it.

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The other evening, I attended the New York Newspaper Women's Club 25th anniversary dinner and dance. My years for dancing are over, but I love to watch other people dance. And occasionally, up at Hyde Park, I get inveigled into doing some old-fashioned dance which leaves me panting but triumphant!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL