My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—Saturday evening I drove in from Lake Success and took the train to Hyde Park so I was home by 10 p.m. It was too dark to see how much the trees had turned, but from my sleeping porch on Sunday morning I could see mirrored in the water of the brook the top of a brilliant red maple tree. Everywhere I looked I saw yellow and gold and red! The leaves have not fallen yet to any great extent, and the weather was warm and pleasant.

I took a walk with Fala early in the morning. I feel really sorry for him these days. I am not bringing him to town, since I cannot look after him or spend any time with him here. Yet he is so glad to see his family and be in his own home once a week that I feel guilty about being away and deserting him. He gets more attention, I think, from our superintendent and his wife while I am gone, but dogs are faithful creatures and he ran all around the house on Saturday evening as though he had to visit every corner of his own domain.

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Yesterday was a busy day. The first of a series of broadcasts, "The World Security Workshop," was begun for the American Broadcasting Company in cooperation with the women observers at the United Nations, and I had to be at the railroad station by 11 o'clock to pick up two of the newspaper correspondents, Sven Ahman of Sweden and Russell Barnes of the Detroit News, who took part in the program. We went straight to the radio studio and since the program was new, we worked hard for the hour before we went on the air.

I was most grateful to Brig. Gen. Carlos Romulo and our other guests for coming up and was glad, too, that they could come back with me to join the picnic I was having for the first group of Committee No. 3, on which I serve in the United Nations. I was elated that the weather man gave us such a beautiful day and I hope my guests enjoyed being out-of-doors as much as I did.

Just as everybody was leaving at about 4 o'clock, my colleague from White Russia, his wife and little boy and an interpreter arrived. They had left New York City at a quarter before one and I never did discover whether they thought it took only fifteen minutes to drive to Hyde Park. We managed to find them some remnants of food to eat, and their little boy, who could talk only Russian, went off gaily to ride a bicycle with my daughter-in-law's little boy and a little girl friend. At that age it seems to be more important to be able to play together than to communicate with each other, and I think the children got on very well together; in fact, better than some of us do when we cannot talk except through an interpreter.

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I went over to the Library at 5 o'clock to meet the French delegation, headed by Foreign Minister Georges Bidault, which came to lay a wreath on my husband's grave. Just before meeting them I met Miss Ray Shaw, the sculptress, and the kind friend who is donating to the library the sculpture which Miss Shaw made of my husband's hands.

So, it was back to New York City for me after supper, with the feeling that on this Sabbath Day there had not been much rest, but nevertheless I was refreshed by the pleasant contact with so many of my colleagues and the beauty of our October countryside.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL