My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—I went on Tuesday night to a concert which I much enjoyed. Under the management of Mr. Milton H. Berger, a young tenor, Mr. William Horne by name, appeared before a very full and enthusiastic house. I do not know what the critics will say of him, and I am no critic, so I can only say that I enjoyed the part of the program which I was able to hear. In the middle, unfortunately for me, I was obliged to leave, but the reason for that I shall tell you about later, and first you might like to know how I came to go to hear Mr. Horne.

He was in Mr. Irving Berlin's show: "This Is The Army," and after the Washington performance, members of the cast came to the White House for a late supper. I enjoyed them all very much, they were so interested in the history and in the beauty of the historic mansion. They were going overseas, and I hoped that it would remain for them a happy memory. One of the cast told me that Mr. Horne had been deeply disappointed because he had been taken ill and had had to miss the performance in Washington and the supper at the White House. I wrote him a note, and on his return to civilian life and his career, he invited me to come and hear him sing. Tuesday night was the first night that I was able to go, and perhaps my enjoyment was heightened by the fact that I had this previous contact with the singer and was interested in him personally and hoped for his success.

I had to leave during the intermission because Cinema Lodge of B'Nai B'rith very kindly presented me with a scroll at their Tuesday night meeting. I always know that this type of recognition is very largely given in memory of my husband, but I am very grateful for the kindness which prompts an undue recognition of me as an individual. I had the pleasure at this meeting, before I went on the platform, of hearing a religious chorus sing some remarkably beautiful songs, so my evening was a distinctly musical pleasure.

Those of us who would ordinarily be working on committees at Lake Success have been given a certain amount of freedom these last few days because there have been plenary sessions at Flushing for election of members to the Security Council, and because of differences of opinion they have lasted longer than had been expected. Our whole delegation did not have to attend and I have welcomed this unexpectedly free time since it gave me an opportunity to do some work in the office and to catch up with the perpetual flow of reports which greet us every morning on our desks! I was also able to attend, yesterday afternoon, the opening of the graphic exhibition on "Poland's Comeback" at the Museum of Science and Industry at Rockefeller Plaza.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL