My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—I wish that everyone would read the article written by former Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson for "Foreign Affairs", but I particularly wish that it could be read in Russia. There is real statesmanship in its calm approach to the difficulties and solutions that are possible in our present relations with Russia.

Above everything else, his statement that through our actions is the only way to persuade other people that our intentions are really good should sink deep into the thoughts of each one of us. We need have no fear of Communism, either at home or abroad, if what we do makes it possible for our people to lead contented and happy lives and helps those in other lands to return to a firm economic basis. In Western Europe the people return to their own traditions; in other lands, perhaps through the development of better standards of living, they will come to understand democracy.

It is results, not words, that count. The Philippines and Cuba are shining examples of proof that we, as a nation do not desire to keep freedom from other people. We do not even try to send exponents of our particular form of government and capitalistic enterprise to form political groups in other countries.

Undoubtedly, there can be found in a nation as big as ours many knaves and many fools. But by and large, our people are sound. They are generous-hearted; they are not covetous. Fortunately, there is enough adventure still available near at hand for us. However, with all our divergencies and seeming lack of unity, it would be well for other nations to remember that we can be consolidated and act with unity, and an attack on us is the sure way to accomplish this!

I suppose I am a foolish optimist, but I cannot believe that a great effort for the good of mankind is going to fail again because two great nations cannot understand each other and, therefore cannot trust each other. I still believe that if even only a suspicious truce can exist between us, still we must continue a bowing acquaintance in the hope that in time friendlier feelings and better understanding may prevail!

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We are soon again to mark "National Employment for Handicapped People Week." Many people think of this just as a week to help returned G.I.'s, who have been handicapped through the war, to get jobs. As a matter of fact, however, there are many people in our country who have suffered from accidents or injury, who must continue to earn a living, and there is almost always prejudice against them for fear that they cannot do as good a job as a well person, or that in one way or another they will be a burden on the employer.

This has been disproved many times. Records of attendance show very few absences of these handicapped people and very few accidents. Therefore, this week has been set apart annually to remind all employers of their duty to try to make an opportunity for the handicapped to be self-supporting, happy people.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL