My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Sunday—Last Thursday I went down to New York City for briefing with the United States delegation to the U. N. General Assembly. Much to my regret, I found that Miss Gildersleeve has been in the hospital with pneumonia. She has therefore resigned as an alternate and so we will not have the benefit of her work at this session. I am sincerely sorry, for I was proud that our delegation had two women on it in the last session. Everyone is so kind to me, however, and I have worked with so many of the members before, that it is really like old home week when we all meet again.

We spent all day Friday and all day Saturday going over various subjects. Yesterday Secretary Marshall joined us and photographers insisted on a delegation picture. I was glad to discover that Secretary Marshall found it almost as difficult as I do to talk on order. When the photographers said: "Talk to Mrs. Roosevelt," or "Talk to Ambassador Johnson," or "Talk to Senator Austin," he looked resigned as he turned time after time, repeating more or less the same words.

There is a great sense among us all of the importance of this session and a great desire to see the United Nations move forward so successfully that the peoples of the world can gain in confidence and security. In talking to the working staff assembled to meet the delegates on Friday afternoon, Senator Austin stressed the real achievements of the U. N. in the field of preventive measures taken against war. I am sure he gave us all a renewed sense of the value of perspective, of patience and of firm determination.

* * *

Well, Senator Taft seems to have made a great discovery. We all of us eat too much in this country. Unlike one of our elder statesmen, who was reported to have said that high prices are due to over-export, Mr. Taft, as I understand yesterday's announcement, believes that high prices are due to greater prosperity here and therefore greater home consumption. I would be extremely glad if I could be sure that the third of the nation which used to be ill-fed, ill-clothed and ill-housed is now getting at least all that it wants to eat. That might go a long way toward increasing production.

Seriously, however, I think Mr. Taft should tell those of us who really do eat more than is good for us just how we should cut down actually to affect the cost of living. It would be a great service to our people at home and to our nation's and the world's future prosperity.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL