My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—In church yesterday morning we prayed for the success of the coming meeting of the General Assembly of the United Nations, and I could not help hoping that a similar prayer was being said in many churches in every country sending delegates. The United Nations will never have smooth sailing, but at the moment there are so many crucial questions in the world that every one of us should refresh our memories as to the purpose for which these nations joined together in this organization.

We ourselves are probably just as responsible as any of the other big nations for the device of the veto. The reason for this is that it seemed possible that the United States might repeat its former isolationist attitude unless something new in the way of safeguarding our liberty of action could be invented. The veto was suggested to make sure that nothing could be put over on us. But, probably rather to our surprise, it is the USSR that has used the veto, and we have come to realize that it can become a purely obstructionist weapon which perhaps we had better do away with.

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In the last day or two, I have been reading a good deal about the reaction of the War Assets Administration to the proposal that the city of Eastport, Maine, should sponsor the use of "Quoddy" Village as a spot where displaced persons could be received and could contribute their labor, for little or no compensation except maintenance and training, for six months on the assembly of certain types of machines. Then they would accompany the machines to some South American country where they would be employed.

I had not fully understood the project until I read that the War Assets Administration's labor advisory group disapproved of it. Of course, I can quite see why labor in general should feel that this might become unfair competition in the field of labor.

As I look back on the original plan to develop power at Quoddy and as I see that power is scarce already in certain parts of the country, I cannot help wondering why the Senators from Maine do not back the revival of this power project for the good of their state, no matter how much pressure the privately owned power companies might bring to bear. Money expended would soon be earned back by the project, and the establishment of new industry would bring prosperity to this area, which needs new life very badly.

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The other afternoon, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Home Club, which has decided to continue its annual meetings in memory of my husband, met on my picnic grounds. They played cards and then they had a short meeting, at which a very charming young lady played her guitar and sang in between the three speeches—one by Judge Conger, one by Mr. George Palmer, who runs the two historic sites here, and one by myself on the United Nations.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL