My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Sunday—We had a nice picnic yesterday with Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Rutman and their son; Mr. and Mrs. George T. Bye; Dr. and Mrs. Charles Hyser and their daughter, and Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Sandifer and their daughter and her young friend, who are staying with me for the weekend. With all of our own children and a young boy who is visiting them, we added up to quite a number. We found a nice place down by the water where the breeze was blowing, and after much food and talk the younger members of the family took to badminton. Finally we all joined at the pool, where a whole collection of children was congregated. I think if one did not enjoy children, dogs and noise, several hours of each day would seem like pandemonium. Fortunately I like it and apparently my household stands up well under it, so the summer is a pleasant time for all of us.

Before I could picnic, however, I visited with two groups which had come to see my library. First came a group of members of the Methodist Federation for Social Action, from Hartford, Connecticut, under the leadership of the Rev. Edward L. Peet. Because the crowd was very great at the library, the group gathered in one of the offices and asked me to say a few words about the Human Rights Commission. I then drove up to the Vanderbilt Inn, where I found a group of social study teachers under the leadership of Merrill F. Hartshorn, executive secretary of the National Council for Social Studies, a department of the National Education Association. He brought me messages from Miss Charl Ormond Williams, and I interrupted their lunch to talk again on the Human Rights Commission and to answer questions.

One of the questions rather frequently asked now is whether Russia's attitude on the Marshall plan means that she wishes to withdraw from the United Nations. There is no way, of course, of knowing anything more about Russia's intentions than she wishes to tell us, but I should doubt her entertaining any real idea of pulling out of the United Nations. Her people do not want war any more than do our own people. They believe that the United Nations is an instrument through which we work for peace. That is what all the people of the world have been led to believe.

Yesterday I was asked when the Marshall plan, if it had been suggested by the U. N., would have inspired less fear on the part of Russia. I hardly think so, since it is quite evident to any nation that if the people of Europe are to get together and take stock of what their resources and their needs for rehabilitation are, they must look to the United States and Latin America for help. Realistically, therefore, we must face the fact that, from an economic standpoint, any real plan must be one in which the United States has the most important role to play. It is vital, however, that the U. N. be acquainted with every step that is taken, and that our actions must always be in accord with U. N. interests.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL