My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Wednesday—One of the most interesting items of news that I have read in a long time was the report of the Baruch Committee on Physical Medicine, particularly the part dealing with the rehabilitation of disabled G.I.'s. In 1944, with a grant of $1,250,000, Bernard M. Baruch established this committee. He has encouraged physiotherapists to serve the needs of the men injured in the war.

Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, chairman of the committee, said a very significant thing and I wish it could become the slogan for all handicapped people. Instead of concentrating "on what you have lost," the theme should always be "what have you left and how can we make the best use of it?"

Undoubtedly the work of this committee has stimulated other groups through the professional consultation and advice given by its scientific advisory committee to the universities participating in its program. However, the disabled veterans who benefit from this program and who, in spite of physical handicaps, earn a living and lead normal lives, are going to be the best encouragement to other handicapped people and will spread the word in the most practical way possible.

* * *

Sad as are the cases of boys injured in the war, there are more people injured by accidents on the road, in industry, and even in housework. For that reason, the value of this committee's work will reach into thousands of households throughout this nation and will spread to other nations.

I saw a portrait the other night of Bernard M. Baruch's father. He was a doctor in South Carolina and he inspired Mr. Baruch's interest in physical medicine by his own work along these lines. His portrait shows one of the most beautiful faces I have ever seen. I am sure it is the greatest satisfaction to his son to have been able to help so many people who needed help, because in looking at the father's face in the portrait, I know his life was dedicated to these ends.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL