My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—I spent Sunday in Geneva, New York, celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Colleges of the Seneca. In 1796, Geneva Academy was founded; in 1822, it became Hobart College; and in 1908, William Smith College which is the women's college, was founded.

I was chairman of a most impressive panel, consisting of the Hon. John G. Winant, former Ambassador to Great Britain, Dr. William A. Eddy, a former president of the colleges and at present an Assistant Secretary of State, and Paul M. Herzog of the National Labor Relations Board. A panel on Saturday had discussed the responsibility of educational institutions in the community and in the state. The Sunday panel discussed this responsibility from the point of view of the nation and the world.

We all attended a very fine evening service at which the Rt. Rev. Charles K. Gilbert, Bishop of New York, preached the baccalaureate sermon and I was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, since I could not be present at the Commencement exercises on Monday.

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My hostess was Mrs. John M. Potter, whose young husband was president of the colleges until he died suddenly last winter. She wanted to carry through his plans and the Board of Trustees helped her to do this. I think she must be very proud of the imaginative and forward-looking program which her husband started.

For instance, those young people who are studying the review of Western civilization cannot fail to meet the problems of today with a better perspective drawn from the past. And the eight-week course planned as "an educational program for leadership in the industrial community" should grow into something of real value in bringing together labor and management. Both must become conscious of their mutual interests and abilities. It has always seemed to me that mutual respect between them would greatly help their negotiations.

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At Lake Success yesterday morning, we held the first meeting of the bill-of-rights drafting committee of the Human Rights Commission of the United Nations. The eight members were all present, though the United Kingdom member, Mr. Geoffrey Wilson, was a little late, having driven straight from the dock when the Queen Elizabeth got in. Monsieur Rene Cassin, the French delegate, was delayed twenty-four hours on his plane, but arrived in New York Sunday night. So it was evident that the attendance at this meeting meant real effort on the part of the members.

The Secretariat had prepared a document which was really an analysis of the many bills which had been presented and a grouping of the rights mentioned in those bills. An enormous amount of documentation, showing the various sources where these rights have already been mentioned, has been done by the Secretariat. The suggestion was made that, after the election of officers and routine procedure of organization was over, we adjourn so that the members of the committee could familiarize themselves with the material in hand before meeting again on Wednesday morning.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL