My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—The dogwood just now is at its most beautiful. Looking out from the porch of the cottage which my husband built and which he always tried to visit in dogwood time, it is simply breathtaking to see the brilliant color of the azaleas near the house with the sea of white dogwood all around.

Every year, my husband tried to come up from Washington to see the dogwood from this porch, but he rarely was able to accomplish it. On those occasions when he did get here, it was a cause for rejoicing. The whole side of the hill is dotted with dogwood trees, and your eyes rest on them with pleasure as you walk.

However, walking in the woods presents a real difficulty. I want to look up at the trees all the time, but I should also keep my eyes constantly on the ground, because there are still a considerable number of the little orange lizards which I mentioned in this column last summer. They are tinier this year than I have ever seen them before and, as they scurry away, I cannot help thinking that my foot must look like the most enormous mountain coming down near them. Then, too, if you look on the ground, you see a carpet of wild flowers. I have never seen so many! The only way I can resolve my difficulty is by standing still and taking my fill of looking up into the trees and then walking with my eyes glued to the ground.

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Today I went over to the Library to greet representatives of the International Council of Nurses. There were, I believe, some twenty countries represented in the group. The International president, Gerda Hojer, who is also president of the Swedish Nursing Association, spoke for them.

The Council has been meeting in Atlantic City in their first post-war congress. Thirty-nine nations are represented in the congress, and the American Nurses Association, the largest member association, was in charge of all meetings. The presiding officer was Effie J. Taylor of New Haven, Conn., dean emeritus of the Yale University School of Nursing. This meeting should help to increase interest in the nursing profession and attract more young women to it.

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I hope my readers have been watching carefully the efforts which have been made to bring before the people of Texas the case of a Negro, Heman Marion Sweatt, who does not have an opportunity for equal training in the law in that state. He has not been admitted to the University of Texas, and there is no other comparable training in the state.

This case has been well covered in the news, and I hope it will continue to be reported. I believe that the fine people of the South, who have always been among our most patriotic citizens, will themselves want to feel that the rights of all citizens, as written into our Constitution and Bill of Rights, are secure everywhere in our nation.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL