My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—After a quiet week in the country, it seemed almost like an adventure to find myself on a crowded train going to New York City on Wednesday morning. For some unknown reason, I had been telling myself that I did not have to go until Thursday, but luckily I looked at the dates and found that Wednesday was the day I was to leave to go to the Choate School in Connecticut.

So I turned a very reluctant little dog over to Mr. Linaka, our superintendent, and departed. Of course, Fala really loves Mr. Linaka, but just at the moment of saying goodbye, he always looks a little bit as though I had beaten him instead of giving him a particularly loving pat.

After a few hours in New York, I was off to New Haven, Conn., where Mr. Robert Atmore met me to drive me to the school. It was seven years since I had been there last. Now I was talking to a new group of boys, this time on the problems which were created by the war and which we have to meet if the United Nations is to build peace in the world.

* * *

Justice Owen Roberts had been with them three weeks before and had left the group fairly well convinced that their only salvation was in a federation of the democracies. I cannot help wondering, if we start in to set up a federation of the democracies, just what countries we would include and where we would draw the line. Naturally we would not include Russia—and any world arrangement which ignores Russia seems to me to be doomed to short duration.

I enjoyed my time with the boys very much and found them an interesting group. Staying overnight with Mrs. George C. St. John, the headmaster's wife, and having breakfast with her was a particularly restful and pleasant experience.

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Yesterday morning, Miss Patricia Cummins from the Willimantic State Teachers College called for me and drove me there to speak again on the United Nations. Here again I found the young people interesting and I enjoyed my visit.

My friend Miss Esther Lape drove over from Westbrook, Conn., to drive me home. We had hoped for a warm day and sunshine, which would make a picnic lunch by the side of the road a possibility. Instead, as we came through the Connecticut hills, we met flurries of snow and so we ate in the car, glad to be protected from the wind.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL