My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—I want to congratulate Sen. Arthur H. Vandenberg for the fight which he has made to get his amendment included in the Greek-Turkish aid bill. I think that amendment should dispel many of the fears that people have had that unilateral action taken by us might be only the first step, to be followed by other nations. If we propose the careful safeguarding which is in this amendment, I think any criticism which has been made will be withdrawn.

The language of the amendment makes cooperation and consultation essential between ourselves and the United Nations. We do not insist that we act only according to our own lights, and we submit to the will of the United Nations, which is a reassuring attitude.

The U.N. approval given to our trusteeship plan in the Pacific islands must have been a satisfaction to our representative, former Sen. Warren Austin, and to the Administration.

I hear that some people who have never been particularly enthusiastic about the United Nations are patting themselves on the back and saying that the first step has been taken to reduce the U.N. power. Sen. Robert A. Taft's desire to do away with civilians on our Atomic Energy Commission and put it under the Army would look as though there really was a group in this country planning for World War III, and hoping to bring it about before anyone else discovers how to use the atom bomb.

If you are developing atomic energy for the good of humanity in civilian affairs, you certainly do not want the commission controlling it to be a military one. If there are people so misguided as to believe that there can be a World War III which would not lead eventually to extinction of our present civilization, I hope they will talk as soon as possible to the best of our nuclear scientists. That is the best cure I know for talking about another war.

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While I was in Quebec, I was given a charming little volume called "Orpheus in Quebec," by J. G. Sime. Anyone who has travelled in the Province of Quebec will realize how different it seems from the rest of Canada, and what great charm it has. Somehow the flavor of French ancestry and the use of the French language gives Quebec a feeling all its own. I recommend this little book to anyone who is going to travel through the province and enjoy its cities and its countryside.

We have learned today that drawing and painting is one of the things that a child needs in order to release something that perhaps he can release in no other way. Years ago in Washington, an artist, Van D. Perrine, N.A., brought to the White House an exhibition of drawings, and now he has written a book called "Let the Child Draw," with the subtitle "An Experiment in Culture Building." Those who are interested in children and in developing their latent talents will find this book, I think, an interesting little volume.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL