My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—This is Brotherhood Week, and all over our nation there will be recognition of the importance of the principles for which this week was established. President Truman issued a message in which he said that he joined with the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and with all forces of goodwill, in commending a nationwide observance of this week.

It is obvious that unless we here can bring about a feeling that all men are brothers, there is little chance of that feeling developing anywhere else in the world. Race or creed or national origin have little to do with the essential brotherhood of man. All of us can encourage cooperation among the citizens of this country by our attitudes in our daily lives, and if we value peace, we will do all we can.

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The other morning, I went to hear a tone poem written by Lou Cooper in honor of my husband. The music is quite beautiful, and the script very moving. Mr. Cooper was at Wright Field, in the Army Air Forces, when my husband died, and the poem was started two days afterwards, but was finished only last year. It will be sung in Dayton, Ohio, with full orchestration, but former Gov. Cox was so enthusiastic about it that he arranged to have it played and sung for me.

The various voice parts were taken by Lucy Kelston, soprano; Helen Stanton, contralto; Robert Marshall, tenor; and Tivis Wickers, baritone. The narrator was Roland Sharon. I have seldom heard anyone read with more feeling and achieve more sense of being a part of the music. There were tears in many eyes. And I think that, when the poem is recorded, there will be many people who will enjoy having it. It expresses what hundreds of people have told me, in one way or another, that they felt on hearing of my husband's death, but few of us can put our feelings into words and music.

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Friday night, I went to the dinner at which the American Association for the United Nations entertained for the World Federation of United Nations. For several days, there had been meetings in New York of the heads of international non-governmental organizations which have a deep interest in the work of the United Nations. The four Group-A organizations which have been granted consultative status all had representatives who spoke at the dinner. Two of these organizations represent labor—the World Federation of Trade Unions, and the American Federation of Labor. One represents the International Chamber of Commerce, and one the International Cooperative Alliance.

It is interesting that there are so many organizations keeping in close touch with the work of the United Nations, and one hopes that they will play an important role in keeping us thinking internationally in the coming years.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL