My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—I took the train to Hyde Park yesterday because I was so afraid our Committee session at Lake Success would not be ended in time for me to get to Poughkeepsie to do a broadcast which I had agreed to do, so I decided to stay in town Saturday night and broadcast at 10:45 from here. It was the final speech that I will have to make in this campaign. I was glad to be able to do it for the Hon. Herbert H. Lehman, since he was one of my husband's friends and associates.

On reaching Hyde Park, I had a walk in the woods with Fala. It is still lovely and the air is soft, for there has been no frost as yet. All the leaves are off the trees, however, and one can see far into the woods where in summer it all seemed dark and mysterious. There are banks and banks this year covered with ground pine which I have marked in my mind's eye, so if the snow comes to cover it up, I will know where to dig when I am looking for Christmas decorations!

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I did not think the representatives of the United Nations on their pilgrimage to my late husband's grave would reach the International Business Machines employees' clubhouse in Poughkeepsie so promptly, but when I reached there at 12:15 they were all seated at table. The board of governors of the club were our hosts for luncheon, and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Watson came up from New York City to greet us.

Short speeches of welcome and thanks were made and, after we had eaten, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., drove me up ahead of the cavalcade so I could be on the steps of the big house at Hyde Park to say a few words of welcome. Paul-Henri Spaak, President of the General Assembly, responded, and then together we went out and he placed a wreath on my husband's grave. I then took him back to the house while other wreaths were laid by various delegations.

I greeted everyone in the house and then went back to see the other wreaths and over to the library before coming home to my cottage.

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I hope the representatives of the various nations who were there, felt rewarded for the long day. Mr. Spaak said it was a pilgrimage which they were all glad to take. I kept hoping that the spirit of friendship which my husband always extended to all people who came to his home would be felt by them, one and all, and that the visit would serve to augment the sense of kindness and international solidarity which can exist even when points of view are different and people have to disagree.

During the war, the one main thing that kept us all together was the need to win the war, but I think my husband's spirit of friendliness toward everyone whom he met, together with his determination to go at least halfway in making the effort to create a friendly atmosphere, were a help in all our international situations.

I do not always find that I agree with my colleagues from other countries on the United Nations, but I never have any feeling of personal antagonism. I think if that sense of friendliness can be preserved among us, we will gradually come to solving all our international problems, no matter how complicated they are.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL