My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—I stayed in Albany until the end of the Democratic State Convention yesterday, and I thought Sen. James M. Mead and former Gov. Herbert H. Lehman gave excellent speeches in accepting the nominations for Governor and Senator. And I liked very much the speech made by young Mayor Erastus Corning, 2nd, of Albany in accepting the nomination for Lieutenant Governor. He is young, but has considerable political experience behind him. It is interesting for me to see the second generation of this family coming into active public service.

Mayor Corning received a tremendous ovation, which was natural as he was in his hometown, where he is very popular. A good background from which to start to win popularity in the state! Since he was a private in Gen. George S. Patton's First Army, he must have been through plenty of hardships and must also be a good soldier. This should make him a good campaigner, since whoever fought under Gen. Patton fought hard and long and kept going on no matter how weary he might be!

It was interesting to see how the whole spirit of the convention seemed to rise as the nominations were made and as the nominees accepted. I think everyone left Albany with the feeling that they had an obligation to do their best, because the Democratic ticket is a good ticket. Unlike the Republicans in Saratoga Springs, we came through our deliberations with no hard feelings and with no bitter antagonisms such as we sometimes have had in our conventions!

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My son Elliott and his wife, Faye Emerson Roosevelt, who was a delegate, seemed to have a wonderful time with the Dutchess County delegation, and I thought the whole delegation enjoyed marching around the hall in the demonstrations, carrying their banner high. I hope this means that this Republican county is going to see a good Democratic organization built up which, with the aid of the Independent Voters Committee, should elect our very excellent candidate for Congress, Capt. Killgrew, and perhaps some of the other members of our local ticket.

One of the big metropolitan newspapers this morning has a wonderful editorial which praises the candidates for governor and the United States Senate on both tickets, and says that these excellent candidates should certainly clarify the issues of the campaign for the independent voter who will be making up his mind how to vote between now and Election Day. I entirely agree with this statement, but it seems to me that, very soon on its editorial page, even this so-called independent paper carries the responsibility to make up its mind which candidates are best, since there are so many partisan papers whose minds are made up before nominations are made!

Miss Thompson and I motored home with Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., in the late afternoon. We stopped for supper in Rhinebeck and arrived home in time to attack a formidable accumulation of mail.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL