My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ALBANY, N.Y. Wednesday—The first day of the Democratic State Convention came to an end with a feeling of enthusiasm, I think, among all those present. I am quite sure that we will be told that this feeling has been equally present at the convention which the Republicans are holding in Saratoga Springs.

A man in office has, of course, many practical advantages. He has state appointees ready to organize his campaign, and people who hope for favors or who have already received them can be called upon for active support.

On the other hand, in this state there is a long-standing tradition of good Democratic government. Frequently, in the past, a Democratic administration has had to carry its program through in spite of a Republican majority in the Legislature. Surprisingly enough, Democratic Governors have often succeeded, even under these difficult circumstances, in putting over their programs.

As yesterday progressed, I think the enthusiasm of the delegates to our Democratic convention increased, as did their sense of solidarity. There is no fight here as in Saratoga. Naturally, it is impossible for everyone to have the candidate of his choice named, and many counties leave a convention with a feeling that they would have liked recognition which they haven't received. These are, however, the fortunes of politics, and what you do not get in one way, you may get in another.

I have rarely seen a convention show so much enthusiasm before the nominees themselves came to the platform. There were two demonstrations yesterday. Banners were marched around the hall, and people streamed out after their banners.

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Mayor William O'Dwyer of New York, who was here Monday night for the caucus of leaders, spent most of yesterday in New York City struggling in vain to bring some kind of understanding between striking truck drivers and their employers. Nevertheless, when he returned here last night, he managed to appear vigorous and enthusiastic as he stepped onto the platform to take his place as permanent chairman of the convention.

I was so glad that my duties as temporary chairman were coming to an end that, when they asked me to cut out a sentence which was in the program, I took it for granted that we had covered our time on the air and did not wait for the signal to present the permanent chairman to the radio audience. Actually, it was too early for the broadcast, so I had to ask Miss Lucy Monroe to lead us in another song, and then I welcomed Mayor O'Dwyer a second time for the benefit of those listening on the air.

It was a satisfaction, however, to repeat what I honestly feel—that the Mayor is making a good record in the City of New York and that we can expect better and better results as he becomes fully acquainted with all the phases of his complicated job. As a man, he wins the respect and affection of those who know him. This was made quite clear by the enthusiastic demonstration which greeted him when I handed over the gavel.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL