My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Wednesday—I went to New York City on Monday afternoon in order to be at the Democratic State Committee headquarters on Tuesday morning to meet Chairman Paul Fitzpatrick and a number of other Democratic leaders. We had a very pleasant meeting, at which they formally requested me to be temporary chairman and keynoter of the Democratic State Convention which opens in Albany next Tuesday, Sept. 3.

I understand that this is the first time that a woman has been asked to be temporary chairman of a New York Democratic convention. I realize, of course, that this honor has been given to me in deference to my husband's memory and in recognition of the importance of women in the Democratic Party—that there is nothing personal in the designation. I only hope I will be able to play my part creditably.

If possible, I would like not only to express the hopes and purposes of the women in the Democratic Party in this State, but to speak, too, of the things that the party as a whole, men and women together, feel are essential to our success in the State and in the nation as well. New York State has often in the past pioneered in Democratic thinking, and I hope it will again in the future.

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I was back here at Hyde Park yesterday in time to entertain two very pleasant guests at luncheon, and then to go to our Dutchess County Fair for the opening of the flower show. I presented the prize for the day for the best all-around exhibit. Mrs. Lynch of Barrytown, who won the prize, had a charmingly decorated tea cart with an awning over it and bells on the side—which she said they used for wheeling food around out of doors. For this exhibit, she had filled the cart with many colored gourds of various shapes and sizes which made a very charming picture.

I liked some of the miniature arrangements of flowers—a lovely table set by Mrs. Saulpaugh of Red Hook was a symphony in blue. The children's exhibits were varied baskets of vegetables as well as arrangements of flowers. Germantown and Tivoli had joined in a very original exhibit—a hat shop with flower hats! This caught and held my eye and made me feel that there were many ways in which one could change or freshen up last year's hat if one used a little imagination.

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All of us will agree, I think, that housing not only for veterans but for many other people is most important now. And it is regrettable to find that our governor feels that our New York State program is impeded by the priorities which have been set to speed the Federal program. It would seem that there must be some lack of coordination when the state and the nation cannot cooperate to build the housing which is most needed, pooling their efforts rather than desiring, apparently, to have the kudos for being "the" agency to produce some place for the numerous homeless families to lay their heads!

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL