My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CAMPOBELLO ISLAND, New Brunswick, Wednesday—Not long ago, I was visited by a business man who has used his business not only for personal success but as a means to achieve something for the good of mankind. He is in the restaurant business in Los Angeles.

He comes from a family of missionaries who spent many years in China. They were, therefore, familiar with famine before the war made famine a word familiar in an ever-increasing area.

Mr. Clinton developed a food which can be quickly prepared and is palatable. In famine areas, each little package would furnish an individual with enough to sustain him for a third of a day. Mr. Clinton's son prepared a small quantity of this food for me and explained that it could have a variety of flavors. Preparation is accomplished in about five minutes. This food is good, and I think it might serve as a basis for a satisfactory diet and be a great benefit in areas where it is difficult to ship and distribute supplies.

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Mr. Clinton started his restaurant business in the early depression years and made up his mind that no one, even if he could not pay, would be turned away hungry! So he developed a 5¢ meal, and anyone who did not have the 5¢ could obtain the meal free. In his laboratory, this food product has undergone many changes since those days!

He is hoping to collaborate with relief agencies everywhere. I can see that this might come to be a basic food used to great advantage for such things as our school-lunch program. He has formed a corporation called "Meals for Millions Foundation." It is organized for humanitarian purposes and will not be operated for profit.

Often, quite unjustifiably, one is just a little suspicious when people say that they want no profit, yet obviously have something which might be produced for great profit! Mr. Clinton, however, seems to be one of those rare business men who, having a successful business, are willing to put time and money into benefitting mankind. Perhaps it is the influence of his ancestors! I have always wondered how much influence our ancestors have upon us, and this gentleman would offer proof that their influence is considerable.

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On every side, I hear the plea for more nurses. In New York state, for instance, hospitals have had to close some of their wards because they cannot get enough trained nurses.

The nursing profession is an unselfish one, but it also has many rewards, even for young women who do not intend to remain in it over a long period of years. The training has many advantages, for if a girl marries, she will find that having been a nurse is a good basis for the care of children and for meeting such emergencies as arise in any family through sickness.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL