My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—On Saturday of last week, I drove to Stamford, Conn., taking Miss Thompson and Dr. Mabel Newcomer of Vassar, who was going over with me to speak at the Community Forum in the afternoon. The drive was beautiful, but just as we were in one of the loneliest spots, a strange clang-clang under the car made itself heard. Dr. Newcomer and Miss Thompson got out to see what was happening, and cheerfully told me that it looked as though the gas tank were about to fall off.

I had a hazy idea that, in a modern car, the gas tank was located so it could not fall off. Nevertheless, I drove the car at a crawl for three miles and finally reached a garage in Carmel. In ten minutes, my muffler was firmly back in place.

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Though this delayed us a little, we were not late for the meeting. The chairman, Rabbi David W. Pearlman, announced that our general subject was "Humanity and Urgency." Then we two ladies and Dr. Broadus Mitchell, director of research for the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, made our short speeches. After which we answered some of the questions which the moderator, Stanley High, put to us. Then the questions came from the floor, showing great interest in the international problems of the moment.

We started home about 4:30 and had an entirely uneventful trip, so we all enjoyed it. And I really appreciated the scenery on the part of the trip where in the morning I had no eyes, since my whole attention had been focused on the ominous clanging every time we hit a slight rise in the road. I had also stalled my car right at a crowded corner and had inconvenienced everybody trying to move in two different directions. Altogether I had not been a happy chauffeur, but the return trip, I hope, restored the confidence of my two passengers.

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Yesterday being Sunday, Dr. and Mrs. P. J. Schmidt, from the United Nations secretariat, came up for the day. With some other friends who were staying with me and my children, we all went on a picnic in Norrie Park. I was pleased to find that so many people are using the facilities provided there. It is so well planned that the groups who want privacy, by walking a little farther, can really find themselves almost completely isolated. It was cool and lovely looking out over the river.

After a rather late lunch, I took my guests for a brief visit to the big house. The crowds were rather large, and so, very soon, we all came back to the cottage to rest in the sun or to swim, until those who had to take a late afternoon train back to New York City were obliged to leave.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL