My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—On Friday in New York I had the pleasure of having Mrs. Gertrude Millin, the well-known writer, and her husband, a South African judge, for a brief chat. I had not seen Mrs. Millin since she was over here long ago, when she came to see my husband and myself. The years roll by very quickly and it seems hardly possible that so many could have passed since her visit.

The Hon. Josephus Daniels also was in New York City on Friday and I was very happy to have a chance for a little visit with him. He is one of the most remarkable men I know of his age. This second World War saw him ready to go back to work on his newspaper just as though he were a young man, and thus he freed his sons to do whatever work seemed to them more essential. I am devoted to Mr. Daniels, and I only hope that old age will make me as wise and kindly as he is. I haven't so many years in which to catch up to him, however, so I doubt if I can hope for his wisdom.

I got home from the United Nations session around 6 Friday evening and left soon after to drive to Hyde Park. It was breathtakingly beautiful the whole way up. There is one place on the parkway where both white and pink dogwood mingle together. The maples are still covered with their little red curling leaves and the green on the willows is the loveliest pale green imaginable. As we got further up to where one can look out from the heights westward over the fields, the sun was setting and the sky was a lovely red.

We had a few guests here Saturday, and in the afternoon I took a visitor over to see Wiltwyck School. Mist and rain were with us all day. But it was a soft, soaking rain which any farmer would enjoy, and in spite of one or two cold nights, I do not think the apple blossoms have really been hurt.

My son and daughter-in-law came home from California this afternoon and found the dogwood around their cottage just as beautiful as I hoped they would.

Miss Thompson and I are leaving Hyde Park this morning because I promised to speak at the Lewisohn Stadium at a citizens' meeting this afternoon where my son, Franklin Jr., is to be chairman. A number of organizations, including the Union for Democratic Action, organized this meeting and I was made honorary chairman. I learned long ago that honorary chairmen are not called upon to do any real work, for which I am deeply grateful.

Late this afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Julien Bryan are going to call for me and give me the great pleasure of seeing some of the latest movies which Mr. Bryan has made. I have been hoping to see these for a long time, since he has been doing what I have long wanted to see done—namely, he is using movies to increase people's knowledge of each other.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL