My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—The other evening, I attended and spoke at a dinner for the United Jewish Appeal. It was given for men in the entertainment field. Billy Rose, the producer, presided and spoke with deep feeling of his experience in visiting displaced persons' camps in Germany last November. The generous response of those present at the dinner was truly heart-warming.

The experiment of driving up to Hunter College yesterday was fairly successful, but it still took me nearly 50 minutes to make the trip! It is a pleasanter trip by car, but I am not sure that driving in New York City isn't more wearisome than taking the subway, even though the latter doesn't start at your own door and bring you back there.

I was attending, as an ex-officio member, the meetings of the United Nations Subcommission on the Status of Women. Their chief discussion yesterday centered on the purpose for which the subcommission was appointed. They finally decided that their objective was to raise the status of women so as to achieve equality with men and greater freedom. In the course of the next few meetings, I think, they will undertake to examine the methods through which this can be accomplished and the areas in which the work must begin.

As in the case of the temporary Human Rights Commission, they will only make recommendations to the Economic and Social Council, but their recommendations will look toward the establishment of a permanent subcommission, and that permanent group will be able to do a great deal to change the world atmosphere in regard to women.

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Miss Thompson and I lunched with George Bye to discuss some business, and late in the afternoon, when I got home from the United Nations meetings, I found a British publisher, Frederick Muller, and the Countess Regina Regis de Oliveira waiting to have tea with me. I was so late that we had been talking only a few minutes when Dr. Algernon Black, of the Ethical Culture Society, came in.

I asked him to tell me about the Encampment for Citizenship which the American Ethical Union is sponsoring at the Fieldston School, New York, from July 1st to August 10th. It sounds like an exciting adventure.

The age group is to be from 17 to 23, and any young people throughout the United States—veterans, students, farmers, teachers, industrial workers—anyone within the age group and able to meet the qualifications may enjoy this interesting experience. The great city of New York will be used as a laboratory, and some outstanding educators will be the directors in the various fields of activity.

As the name of the encampment implies, it is an effort to help the young people of today to understand their world in transition. We have won a war, but we still have a peace to win, and to do that successfully, our young people must know more about being good citizens than their elders knew.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL