My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—Yesterday morning, I began the day by making a recording at the NBC studios for the Treasury bond-selling campaign. I think it was done in record time! Since only fifteen minutes was all that I could give, that was the time I spent in the studio!

Gradually the mystery of getting around New York City on the subways is solving itself for me. I discovered yesterday morning that I could start from 50th Street on the 8th Avenue uptown subway, get off at Kingsbridge Road, and find myself within a short walk of Hunter College. Even though the subways are the quickest way of getting around town, going a long distance takes time, and I have finally had to realize that the trip from Washington Square to Hunter College takes from 50 to 55 minutes. Today I am making the experiment of driving my car up to the college to see if I make better time!

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At the second meeting of the Human Rights Commission yesterday morning, we progressed to the next points on our agenda, but the delegate from Russia, Nikoli Kriukov, drew our attention to the fact that we had had no time to examine certain documents which we were expected to consider. It seemed wise, therefore, to leave these particular documents for a later session, when all of us will have had a chance to go over them more carefully. We adjourned at 12 o'clock to give everybody time, before the afternoon session, to read certain portions of the Preparatory Commission's report and some of the discussions in the Economic and Social Council on the subject of setting up the Human Rights Commission.

Between sessions, I was able to attend a luncheon given by Miss Dorothy Kenyon for the members of the Subcommission on the Status of Women.

When we met again at 3 o'clock, we began to consider the definite recommendations we should make for setting up the permanent Human Rights Commission. There seemed to be fairly general agreement that approximately 18 members would be a large enough number for service on the permanent commission, but the only point on which there was no dissent was that those named should be eligible for reappointment. There is, as yet, no general agreement on whether to recommend that the members of the commission represent governments or be chosen as individuals, nor are we agreed as to the length of service.

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The discussion yesterday was purely informal, to ascertain the first thoughts of the commission members on these questions. Their points of view may change with further discussion.

It was with great pleasure that we welcomed Prof. Rene Cassin, the delegate from France, who had been delayed in his air trip to this country but who arrived during the afternoon session.

I reached home in time to see, for a short time, a young New Zealand woman married to an American—Mrs. Grover Churchill. Her husband served in the Navy during the war. Now that she has come here, she does some lecturing on her native New Zealand.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL