My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—So many tributes have been paid in the last few days to Chief Justice Harlan Stone that I have waited until now to add my little word of appreciation for a very great citizen. He was a liberal and stood out many times for the liberal point of view. I think the quality which a casual acquaintance, such as I was, sensed most keenly about him was his calm courage. You knew instinctively that if he believed in a thing, he would stand by it.

He and Mrs. Stone always seemed to me a wonderful couple, in complete sympathy in the way they faced life and lived it. I only hope that having had years when the problems of life could be shared, Mrs. Stone as she now faces life alone will be able to draw strength from the past.

Justice and Mrs. Stone lived together with so much purpose in life that I am quite sure she will find the courage to continue to work toward the ends they both believed in. Lives such as Chief Justice Stone's contribute to the character of a nation. Each life is a brick in the nation's wall of defense, for the spirit of the good man strengthens the spirit of those who take up his fight and follow after him.

* * *

My aunt, Mrs. David Gray, and I drove up to Hyde Park yesterday morning in the cold and rain. Part of the time it was actually snowing; but when we arrived, Fala greeted us with such warmth that I had to take him for a walk in the woods at once, regardless of the weather. A bright wood fire burned on my hearth and when I got back I was glad to warm myself in front of it.

Yesterday we had several guests at lunch. Then Mrs. Gray and I went to the old house to hunt for various things which belonged to other people and which my mother-in-law had stored for them. I had been meaning to find them and send them to their owners ever since I moved them to the cottage, but I have been neglectful. Triumphantly I discovered them all and I hope this week they will start to their destinations. Whenever I look at the accumulation of things that I still have to sort, and whose eventual disposition I must decide, I am really filled with dismay as to when I shall find the time.

Then we went over to the big house, as Mrs. Gray wanted to see it again. We found that even in this bad weather there were a goodly number of people wandering around and seeing the sights. We came back at last and hugged the fire, but were nevertheless very grateful for the rain—for it has saved several thousand little trees which we planted, and I am sure has meant a great deal to all of the farmers of the neighborhood.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL