My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—This morning I am going over to receive a collection of newspapers which the Common Council for American Unity is giving to the library as a memorial to my husband. They are issues of foreign-language papers published on the days after he died a year ago.

So many people have been kind enough to remember the anniversary of my husband's death and send me tributes to his memory. I deeply appreciate it and wish that I could write each one a note of personal thanks. But I am afraid this will not be possible, so I want here to express my gratitude. I feel sure that the hope so many have expressed—that my husband's faith in people will be fulfilled—and his own hopes for a happier future for the average man will be carried on successfully by our present and future leaders.

I very deeply appreciate the President's coming up here today to attend the ceremony incident to the final taking over by the government of the house and the land deeded to the United States by my husband. I hope that this gift will bring interest, inspiration and pleasure to the people of the country in the years to come.

* * *

On Wednesday, I went to Hartford, Conn., to speak at a meeting of representatives from many counties in Connecticut who have been interested in the study of international affairs. They came to represent their groups and report back to them. I spoke about the United Nations meeting in London.

The meeting was held in the auditorium of the Fox Department Store. It looked like a most beautiful store and, being a woman, I would have loved to have time to go through it! However, when the lecture was over, we had to hurry off, because Governor and Mrs. Baldwin had been kind enough to invite us to meet a few women at tea at the Executive Mansion.

Connecticut has only just provided its governor with a house, so Mrs. Baldwin showed it to us with great pride. It certainly is charmingly arranged and very convenient for the kind of entertaining which falls to the lot of most governors.

I dined and spent the night with my cousin, Mrs. Joseph Alsop, in Avon but we drove back to Hartford in the evening for a big meeting held in the interests of the United Jewish Appeal.

Thursday morning, I drove over to Waterbury, where they had a most successful women's luncheon for this appeal. There is only a small Jewish community in Waterbury—800 families—but they have accepted a quota of $200,000 in this exceptional drive, which is being made to raise $100,000,000 for the rescue and rehabilitation of the Jews of Europe. Some of the ladies kindly drove me home, but we did not reach Hyde Park until nearly six o'clock.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL