My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—Yesterday, I went to a luncheon of the Executives Association of Greater New York. This is an organization comprising one member from all the different trades and businesses within the city. They have an affiliation with a comparable group in London, and they invited me to the luncheon to receive from the British group a very beautifully bound memorial edition of the London Times containing Winston Churchill's speech in Parliament and a record of various other commemorative tributes at the time of my husband's death. This I am to place in the archives of the library at Hyde Park.

It was for me a most interesting and delightful occasion and I was deeply appreciative. As a return gift for the British Executives Association, the New York group had a gavel and sounding block made from the teakwood planks of the deck of the battleship Oklahoma, which was sunk at Pearl Harbor. The appropriate inscriptions bring to mind the fact that the sinking of this ship marked the time when Great Britain and the United States joined together to fight and win the war.

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Prior to this luncheon, I attended a meeting of representatives from a large number of organizations which have banded together to give aid to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in their legal defense of the men who were imprisoned in Columbia, Tenn. Every effort will be made to see that the full light of publicity is thrown on this case and that the ends of justice are served, since it is important that a repetition of anything of this kind be prevented if possible.

In the afternoon, I met Mrs. Winthrop W. Aldrich and Mrs. Sidney C. Borg, and other members of the city's United Nations committee, to talk over the plans for hospitality which will be made available for those working here with the United Nations.

A group of friends came in for tea, among them Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Chandor, Frank Sinatra, and the Polish Minister of Labor. In the evening, I went to speak at the City Center for the New York University School of Commerce Alumni Association.

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On the whole, yesterday was rather a full day, and today in Philadelphia promises to be even more fully occupied. I think that, now that spring has come, I shall make it a rule that, under no circumstances, regardless of people's persuasive powers, will I make more than one speech a day!

Every one wants me to talk about the same thing—the United Nations—and before long, they are going to be so tired of my particular presentation of the subject that they will have to go out and find someone who can talk about it from another point of view! I have said right along that we must keep alive the interest in the U. N., but I think the subject requires presentation by many different people.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL