My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—The night before last was an unforgettable evening. I went to see "Antigone" with a friend who fortunately appreciated it as much as I did. It would be presumptuous of me to try to praise the work done by Miss Cornell and Sir Cedric Hardwicke. Everything that they did was beautifully done, so I can only speak with deep gratitude that it was made possible for me to see something as moving and as beautiful as this play. Naturally this is not the play that Sophocles wrote yet the essence of what he wanted to convey is all there. I wish that I could have seen it given in French before the German censors. M. Jean Anouilh must have done a very interesting piece of writing to get the story past the censors, and have it give the French, who were subtle enough to understand the lift of seeing their masters condemned for their crimes against France and yet be oblivious to what was being conveyed through the drama! The translation here by Lewis Galantiere is very beautiful and I thought that Mr. Braham as the chorus was remarkable. I am tremendously proud that something as fine as this is on our New York stage and that it has a good audience. When the curtain went down it took me a minute to realize that the play was over and that I was not in Thebes, but back in the modern city of New York where the same old fight is going on between the things of the flesh and the things of the spirit! We certainly need a modern Antigone, but I don't know just where we are going to find her!

The following request has come to me and I am glad to comply with it. In a letter from West Brayton, Middlesex County, England is the following paragraph:

"Would you through your daily columns give a mother's thanks for all those nice letters, which have been sent to this country by returned G.I.'s. They are most gratifying."

I am very glad that our young soldiers were so appreciative of the hospitality shown to them by individuals in Great Britain and that they took the trouble to write those who had been kind. It will mean a great deal to people who have to continue their war time restrictions and do not find it any more pleasant than we would, if fate had so willed it that our people had been the ones to suffer similar restrictions.

Over the radio yesterday morning I heard an appeal on the "Farm Hour" between six and seven A.M. asking that all of us eat one less slice of bread a day and making the very good suggestion, I thought, that instead of having bread for breakfast, we have a small amount of oatmeal. We can use up any stale bread left from the day before to make plain toast or french toast, since stale bread is better than fresh bread, if you are going to toast it. The Department of Agriculture also urged the use of potatoes instead of bread and some ladies may be glad to know that potatoes are less fattening than bread! In Europe for the greater part of the people the main meal today consists of soup with a potato base and a few slices of carrots placed in it. They do have a hunk of dark bread with it, but we have plenty of things to take the place of bread and can have a well balanced diet. Fruit and cheese are now available and I find a slice of apple with a thin slice of cheese a very good substitute for a sandwich!

TMsd 8 March 1946, AERP, FDRL