My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Wednesday—I was very much interested yesterday morning talking with Judge Anna M. Kross, who is planning the General Federation of Women's Clubs' program for the National Youth Conservation Clearing House. It seems to me it would be very valuable to have all the agencies interested in working with young people come together to discuss their programs and to see how best they can do all the work which needs to be done. Meanwhile, I am following their proposals with a great deal of interest.

At 12:30 I talked for a few minutes with young Svend-Aage Beyer-Pedersen, chairman of the Danish Youth Association, and a member of the World Youth Council in London, who is now visiting groups of young people in this country with the aid of the "Youth For A Free World."

In the evening I attended the dinner given by the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, at which the annual Thomas Jefferson award was given to Justice Hugo L. Black. This is given every year to the individual who has made outstanding contributions to progress during the year. There was a galaxy of Senators, Justices and officials present.

* * *

At 9:30 this morning I went on the air with Miss Eleanor Howard, who is devoting her radio time this week to telling the people of our country what the Red Cross really does accomplish with their money. At the same time we were asked to say a word about the paper drive which is now on. Of course, we are not saving paper in this country in the way they have been forced to save it in other countries nearer the war fronts, and it will not be a great hardship for most of us to carry our parcels home without having them wrapped.

Way back in 1942, Londoners began saving one piece of paper for use when buying something which absolutely had to be wrapped. They would take the paper along with them when starting out to shop. There, however, the housewives also trundle little carts to market every morning, and a good deal can go in the bottom of their baskets unwrapped.

* * *

At 10:30 a group of American servicemen who have been prisoners of war in Germany and in the Philippines, and who have been speaking all over this country for the Red Cross, came to see me. There were 21 young men and they were the most interesting people I have talked with in a long time. When we read the horrible stories of German prison camps today, it must encourage the families of our prisoners to talk to these young men who have survived.

At noon I go to the Fashion Group lunch, and then on to New York City.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL