My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—- Last night's dinner proved to be a real victory dinner for Aubrey Williams. Instead of just meeting with the National Farmers Union workers, state presidents and staff, it was quite a distinguished roster of Cabinet members, Senators and Representatives from both parties which James Patton called upon to rise. I think perhaps it was more than a victory dinner for an individual, because every occurrence which touches the life of the people and makes them really look into some particular thing that has happened in government must eventually bring greater education to them. I am one of those who willingly live in a democracy where we wait for education so that we abide by genuine majority rule, because that is real rule by the people. Victory is always attained when more people become really thinking citizens.

Aubrey Williams himself does not need praise from any one of us. He lives up to his convictions, and that knowledge within one's own soul is better than any outside praise.

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The National Society for Crippled Children and Adults of Elyria, Ohio, has asked me to remind as many people as possible than when they buy Easter seals they are contributing to the care of crippled children, and that the campaign ends on April 1. They tell me, for instance, that the cerebral palsy clinic conducted by the District of Columbia Society for Crippled Children is financed from the sale of Easter seals. Like the tuberculosis seals which all of us have bought around Christmas time for many years past, this sale is becoming a fixture in our minds, and I am quite sure that everyone gladly contributes his small mite which swells into such a great benefaction.

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The United National Clothing Collection is calling everybody's attention to the fact that April 8 to 14 will be the period during which their workers will come to every door, asking if you are observing "Clean Out Your Clothes Closet" week. Even if you are not visited by one of their workers, you will be told over the radio where you can send your contribution to this gigantic effort.

In a letter to Henry J. Kaiser, Mrs. H. Cleo Burris of Redlands, California, suggested a thought which many of us may well remember: "Am I wearing it now? If not, out it goes." That is a good slogan, but don't confine your closet cleaning to clothes alone. Remember that all over the world there are people whose household goods have been completely destroyed. Among the few things we will be able to send them in the next few months are materials which can be packed with other necessary things that have to be shipped for the war. These materials can be poked into corners, or in between packing cases, and they will mean a great deal to the comfort of the men, women and children who have undergone far more hardships for a far longer time than any of us.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL