My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—Staying with Mrs. Julius Cone in Greensboro, N.C., was certainly a restful way of fulfilling one's obligations on a trip of this kind. At least when one was not on public parade, peace and comfort surrounded one. Her house is charming, with space and comfort, and good taste on every hand. Books are everywhere, and that to me always makes a home.

After breakfasting in our rooms at 8:30 yesterday, we were ready to leave at 9:30 when Colonel Younts, commanding officer of the replacement camp, came for us to spend an hour in his area. First we went to a big tent where dances are held and entertainments given. The very excellent orchestra, combined with men's voices and a very good announcer, gave a stirring and moving demonstration, or roll call of the United Nations. After a short talk to 2500 assembled personnel, we followed some of the men who were being processed. From the place where they received medical "shots" to the final spot where their equipment was checked over for the last time, everything was methodically done. They even have a chance to write their last letter home and mail it before leaving the building.

We then went through several wards of the hospital, and I was glad to find that here, at least, they have comparatively few seriously wounded men.

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At 11 o'clock we went over to the Woman's College of the State University, and I had a press conference where the college and high school press, as well as the regular press, were represented.

At 12 noon I spoke to their assembly, and at one o'clock a small group of us lunched with Dean and Mrs. Jackson. At 2:30, we went to Greensboro College, which is a Methodist college. Here they have some 400 girls, in contrast to the 2250 who make up the Woman's College.

In both colleges, the young women were an interested and vital group who gave you the feeling that they had great possibilities for achievement in the future. This world of young people, especially of young women, is a very exciting world, for in their hands lies so much of the promise of this nation as well as of the possibility of progress for the world as a whole.

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The campus of the Woman's College is a charming campus. Two of the buildings I saw were built by the Works Progress Administration. They are a credit to that period during which we did so much of lasting value for the country, even though many people regard it as having been a period when we lost some of our individual independence.

From 4 to 5 there was a tea at the Woman's College in one of their main halls, attended by faculty and students. That ended my official obligations, but Mrs. Cone very kindly invited some friends to a reception in the evening at her home after a small dinner. Then we boarded the train and arrived back in Washington this morning.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL