My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Monday—We were delighted to have Her Royal Highness, the Princess Juliana of the Netherlands, arrive at the White House early Saturday afternoon to spend the weekend with us.

After two appointments in the afternoon on Saturday, I went to the Corcoran Art Gallery to look at the 19th biennial exhibition of contemporary American oil paintings.

At 5 o'clock the former consul at Niagara Falls, Canada, the Hon. Lynn W. Franklin, and Mrs. Franklin came to have tea with me before leaving for Curacao. Mrs. Stephen B. Ives also came, and brought three of her friends, Mrs. John Chafee, Mrs. John Sensenbrenner and Mrs. George D. Seldon.

Saturday evening we had a small, informal dinner for the Princess Juliana, and Sunday we had a few people at lunch. Sunday, on the whole, was a quiet day, but at 4 o'clock I had my usual party for servicemen from Walter Reed and St. Elizabeth's hospitals. We had a few guests for Sunday evening supper.

Sometimes one finds oneself doing strange things! It would have been far easier to go straight from Washington to Greensboro, North Carolina, where I have to spend Tuesday and Wednesday, but long before I made that engagement I agreed to speak today at the interdenominational ministers meeting in New York, so we journeyed up here this morning. I will have an opportunity to see my cousin, Mrs. Henry Parish, who has not been well, and then will go to the meeting and take the train tonight.

In one of the papers the other day, the results of a poll of the Senate on the question of setting up some machinery for international cooperation were published. It is interesting to note that the real difficulty of getting a plan for some kind of organization through the Senate will not come from those who want no such organization. It will come from the perfectionists and the reservationists, who want an organization very badly, but who want only their own kind of organization or one that is in some respect different from what the other United Nations agree on.

When you realize that other nations must have the same anxieties about subordinating their sovereignty that we have, one almost despairs of this effort to set up cooperative machinery on which to build peace. It is going to be well nigh impossible unless the people of this country state in no uncertain terms to their representatives that no one will be forgiven who prevents the setting up of some international machinery because of any specific objection.

Compromise means that everybody gives way a little. Those who cannot compromise should be looked down upon by their neighbors and their constituents.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL