My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Sunday—On Thursday in Washington I went at 4 o'clock to the interdepartmental auditorium to attend a meeting of personnel officers attached to various government departments, and I got home at 5:30 to find that our guest, Mrs. Grenville Emmet, had already arrived.

In the evening the East-West Association had a meeting in the East Room of the White House. We saw some of their Chinese plays, and heard a number of speakers tell of the association's work throughout the country in developing an interest in other peoples. It was a stimulating evening, and I particularly enjoyed seeing the paintings made in China by an American army sergeant. He had heard about the East-West Association and had sent the paintings back in a desire to help. They were really well done: the artist had caught the bony structure in the faces and had made some character studies which are unforgettable.

Friday morning I went to New York City. Miss Helen Ferris of the Junior Literary Guild lunched with me and told me of some of the books which they are preparing for submission to us on the board.

In the afternoon I went with Arthur C. Gillette to Madison, New Jersey, to speak at the centennial celebration of the New Jersey Consumer Cooperative, Inc. They have had a cooperative organization for 12 years in Madison, and evidently have a very successful consumer cooperative store.

I visited two small war plants, both of which are making vital war materiel and working very well. They are already employing some returned veterans, and I was glad to have had a chance to congratulate the management and the workers. I had a chance also to look at their municipal building, which is the gift of Mrs. Marcellus Hartley Dodge, and a very beautiful structure.

After a buffet dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Gillette and some of their friends—including Mrs. Phillip McKim Garrison of Llewellyn Park, who is an old friend of my aunt, Mrs. Douglas Robinson—we went to the meeting in the school auditorium. Before a capacity audience, Judge Thurman Arnold gave an extremely interesting and illuminating address about the place of cooperatives in the economy of the future. At the end of the meeting I had a few minutes to shake hands with some 30 people. Then I caught a train back to New York City which gave me time to change and pack and take the midnight train back to Washington.

I had three appointments Saturday morning, and did a recording for a broadcast which will take place next week in connection with the United National Clothing Collection.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL