My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—On Tuesday, after getting back from visiting the Army redistribution center in Asheville, North Carolina, I had supper with the Girl Scout day and permanent camp leaders who are taking a two-weeks training course at Montreat Inn. Immediately afterward, in the lobby of the inn, the Brevard College chorus gave an informal program of mountain songs which was delightful.

At the evening session Arthur M. Bannerman, president of Warren-Wilson College at Swannanoa, opened the discussion on education in the mountains. So much talk followed both the summarizing of the morning sessions and Mr. Bannerman's speech on the student who must earn his education through work, that the second speaker of the evening never got a chance to make his statement and had to wait until yesterday morning.

"Education in the Mountains" was the subject of the Wednesday morning program, and at 11:15 we went over to Warren-Wilson College for a chapel program and dinner. The afternoon was partly taken up by business meetings and partly by a summing up of the two days' sessions, as well as a continuation of a discussion on education on the college level.

We made the afternoon train quite easily, and this morning found us back in Washington. I feel that I learned a great deal in these two days and am very grateful that I was asked to take part in the discussions of the Council of Southern Mountain Workers.

I find that in giving you the rule for mailing letters and parcels to prisoners of war in Germany, a few mistakes were made, so I want to note the changes here:

When regular correspondence blanks are not used, the writer should address his letter just the same as he does on the regular form, but the letter should then be put into a second envelope. Leave this second envelope unsealed, and address it: "Postmaster, Prisoner of War Mail." All of these go to New York.

When a person has been notified that a man is a prisoner of war, but there is still no address as to what camp he is in, the mail should be addressed in care of the International Red Cross, Directory Service, Geneva, Switzerland.

I was deeply grieved to read the other day of the death of Mrs. Fraser, the wife of the Prime Minister of New Zealand. She was so kind to me in New Zealand, and so thoughtful of and interested in our boys in hospitals there. Her death must be a grief to the whole people of New Zealand, and to her husband and family an irreparable loss.

E. R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL